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I have Map <A, List<A>> map = new HashMap<A, List<A>>();

Say I want to print out each element in List<A> via an enhanced for loop

doing map.get(KeyOftypeA) does not return an iterable list...seems it returns a generic Object what do I do to get back the nice list i input and make it iterable?...

EDIT: Here's the full listing of the code I am trying to run

import java.util.*;



public class StuffTag {

    public static void main (String[]args){
        String stuff;
        List<String> tags = new ArrayList();
        Map<String,List<String>> stuff_tags = new HashMap<String,List<String>>();
        List<Map> list_stuff_tags = new ArrayList();

        stuff="David and Goliath";
        tags.add("fire");
        tags.add("water");
        tags.add("smoke");
        tags.add("paper");

        stuff_tags.put(stuff, tags);
        list_stuff_tags.add(stuff_tags);
        Map el =list_stuff_tags.get(0);
         for(String x:el.get("David and Goliath"))
             System.out.println(x);

    }

}
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Show how you are attempting to get the list and do the for loop, because this is supposed to work. –  Vincent Ramdhanie May 15 '11 at 1:13
    
I've included this in the edit.. thanks! –  algorithmicCoder May 15 '11 at 1:27
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You need to define type of Map el e.g, Map<String,List<String>> el =list_stuff_tags.get(0); this will work for you.

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List<A> list = (List<A>)map.get(KeyOfTypeA);

Anyway there seems to be something wrong. If your A type is specified correctly at compile time you shouldn't need to do that cast. How are you specifying A type?

Probably you are not specifying the type. Supposing A is a String type, somewhere in your code you should have done something like that:

class yourClassStoringHashMap <A>{
       Map <A, List<A>> map;
}
class whereYouInstantiate{
 static void int main(){
       yourClassStoringHashMap<String> instance = new yourClassStoringHashMap<String>();
       //probably you are doing yourClassStoringHashMap instance = new yourClassStoringHashMap();
 }
}

Compiler should give a warning on that line.

EDIT:

Here's the problem

List<String> tags = new ArrayList(); //should be new ArrayList<String>
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