Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a Java thread:

class MyThread extends Thread {
  @Override
  public void run() {
    BufferedReader stdin =
        new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(System.in));
    String msg;
    try {
      while ((msg = stdin.readLine()) != null) {
        System.out.println("Got: " + msg);
      }
      System.out.println("Aborted.");
    } catch (IOException ex) {
      ex.printStackTrace();
    }
  }
}

}

In another thread, how do I abort the stdin.readline() call in this thread, so that this thread prints Aborted.? I have tried System.in.close(), but that doesn't make any difference, stdin.readline() is still blocking.

I'm interested in solutions without

  • busy waiting (because that burns 100% CPU);
  • sleeping (because then the program doesn't respond instantly to System.in).
share|improve this question
    
Interesting. It would also be interesting to know how to abort a thread listening to incoming client-socket data. Hopefully the solution is pretty similar to this problem :) –  rzetterberg May 15 '11 at 11:46
    
This is a more general question that reading from stdin - The java.io stuff is blocking I/O, and there are many existing questions about this more general problem. –  skaffman May 15 '11 at 11:50
    
@Ancide: For sockets, I have a solution: closing the socket in another thread makes the readLine in MyThread raise a SocketException with "Socket closed". So I can abort MyThread this way. –  pts May 15 '11 at 13:20
    
Nice! thanks for sharing :) –  rzetterberg May 16 '11 at 17:16
add comment

6 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

My first reaction is that a thread and System.in really don't go together.

So first, split this so that the thread code does not touch any static including System.in.

A thread reads from InputStream and passes into a buffer. Pass an InputStream into your existing thread that reads from the buffer but also checks that you haven't aborted.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for suggesting not to use statics in threads, it's a nice coding style improvement. But it's also irreleveant to my question. –  pts May 15 '11 at 13:23
    
``also checks that you haven't aborted'' -- yes, exactly that's I want to do but I don't know how to do this when the thread is blocked stdin.readLine(). Could you please elaborate? –  pts May 15 '11 at 13:23
1  
@pts Statics are relevant to your question. / Two threads: One reads from the stream and blocks on I/O; one (your existing thread) reads from a buffer and blocks on a lock. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline May 15 '11 at 13:40
add comment

Heinz Kabutz's newsletter shows how to abort System.in reads using a buffer and ExecutorService.

Now, I don't know whether this approach leaks, isn't portable or has any non-obvious side-effects. Personally, I would be reluctant to use it.

You might be able to do something with NIO channels and file descriptors - my own experiments with them didn't yield any results.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for these suggestions. I also think it could work with NIO somehow, but it would be too much work to rewrite my program to use NIO, so I'm looking for other options now. ExecutorService, as you describe it, would definitely work, but I'm still looking for something less ugly. –  pts May 15 '11 at 13:37
1  
hi pardon me if i understand incorrectly, after reading the article, it seem to suggest not so much about ExecutorService (which is used to grab the result from the thread), but more about using BufferedStream ready() and sleeping so that the thread can be interruptible. –  goh Oct 24 '12 at 7:48
    
@goh - Looking at my code again, I believe you are correct. I'll remove the sample & leave the link. –  McDowell Oct 24 '12 at 12:54
add comment

JavaDoc for BufferedReader.readLine:

Returns: A String containing the contents of the line, not including any line-termination characters, or null if the end of the stream has been reached

Based on this, I don't think it'll ever return null (can System.in actually be closed, I don't think it ever returns end of stream?), so the while-loop won't terminate. The usual way to stop a thread is either use a boolean variable in a loop condition and change it from outside of the thread or call the Thread-objects' interrupt() -method (only works if the thread is wait():ing or sleep():ing, or in a blocking method that throws InterruptedException). You can also check if the thread has been interrupted with isInterrupted().

Edit: Here's a simple implementation utilizing isInterrupted() and interrupt(). The main-thread waits 5 seconds before interrupting the worker-thread. In this case worker-thread is basically busy-waiting, so it's not that good (looping all the time and checking stdin.ready(), you could of course let the worker-thread sleep for a while if no input is ready):

import java.io.BufferedReader;
import java.io.IOException;
import java.io.InputStreamReader;


public class MyThreadTest
{
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        MyThread myThread = new MyThread();
        myThread.start();

        try
        {
            Thread.sleep(5000);
        }
        catch(InterruptedException e)
        {
            //Do nothing
        }

        myThread.interrupt();

    }

    private static class MyThread extends Thread
    {       
        @Override
        public void run()
        {
            BufferedReader stdin = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(System.in));
            String msg;

            while(!isInterrupted())
            {
                try
                {
                    if(stdin.ready())
                    {
                        msg = stdin.readLine();
                        System.out.println("Got: " + msg);
                    }
                }
                catch(IOException e)
                {
                    e.printStackTrace();
                }
            }           
            System.out.println("Aborted.");
        }
    }

}

It seems there's no way to actually interrupt the BufferedReader if it's blocked on readline, or at least I couldn't find one (using System.in).

share|improve this answer
1  
Thank you for composing your answer, but it doesn't solve my problem. Calling myThread.interrupt() does not interrupt the readLine() call on System.in, not even after System.in.close(). –  pts May 15 '11 at 13:17
    
Check the edited post –  esaj May 15 '11 at 13:50
    
Doesn't work on Windows. Windows does not echo input during ready(), so not suitable for an interactive solution. –  Cookie Monster Mar 12 '12 at 12:23
add comment

How about...

private static BufferedReader stdInCh = new BufferedReader(
    new InputStreamReader(Channels.newInputStream((
    new FileInputStream(FileDescriptor.in)).getChannel())));

A thread where stdInch.readline() is called is now interruptible and the readline() will throw a java.nio.channels.ClosedByInterruptException.

share|improve this answer
    
Doesn't work for example on Mac OS X with JDK 1.7. readLine() does not react on interrupt(). –  Cookie Monster Mar 12 '12 at 12:23
    
Same here :( I had faith in non blocking –  demil133 Apr 30 '13 at 1:13
add comment

Whats about defining a field within your above thread class definition like:

class MyThread extends Thread {   

  protected AtomicBoolean abortThread = new AtomicBoolean(false);

  public void doAbort()
  {
    this.abortThread.set(true);
  }

  @Override   public void run() 
  { 
    ...
    if (this.abortThread.get())
    {
      ...something like break loop...
    }
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
The thread is blocking on System.in. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline May 15 '11 at 12:01
    
does calling System.in.ready() before actually reading out of the stream helps? –  Omnaest May 15 '11 at 12:19
    
@user625146: Thank you for coming up with your proposal, but it doesn't work. I fail to see how setting abortThread would abort the call to System.in.readline(). –  pts May 15 '11 at 13:28
    
@user625146: What if ready() returns false? How do I make MyThread wait for the next line, without busy waiting (100% CPU use)? –  pts May 15 '11 at 13:32
    
Putting your thread into sleep with a predefined amount of time. This can be done by a second surrounding while loop. You enter your read-while-loop only if the reader is ready if not you put your thread to sleep. Does this work? –  Omnaest May 15 '11 at 13:43
add comment

Have you tried:

Thread myThread = new MyThread();
myThread.start();
// your code.
myThread.interrupt();

The interrupt method will throw an InterrupedtException and you can handle the code after that.

share|improve this answer
    
Interruptible I/O was briefly enabled on Solaris, but generally does not work. (Interrupts are horrible anyway.) –  Tom Hawtin - tackline May 15 '11 at 12:01
    
It is horrible, but he asked: how do I abort the stdin.readline(), so, it is a way to do it. The idea of reading System.in inside this thread is wrong. –  Pih May 15 '11 at 12:11
    
"Abort" does not necessarily imply Java thread interrupt mechanism. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline May 15 '11 at 12:16
    
So,what is your solution? –  Pih May 15 '11 at 12:27
    
Thank you for coming up with this suggestion, but it doesn't work for me. myThread.interrupt() doesn't make any difference. stdin.readLine() is still blocked, waiting for more input to be read from System in. –  pts May 15 '11 at 13:26
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.