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I am programming some server-client software and wanted some encryption. Both the server and client share a private key which is fixed length. Haven't decided what length I am going to have the key, but I do know that the key will be between 1 and 32 characters. The key is predetermined (so for instance I may decide I want the key to be abc1234)

I am programming in Java and need the algorithm to be a quick as possible as the clients are most likely to be mobile devices. I don't need any compression but I would prefer if the encrypted string wasn't larger.

I am not looking for top-notch encryption here obviously, but it is my understanding that any key based encryption can't be broken without knowledge of the private key anyway.

Can anyone recommend me an algorithm/method for encryption/decryption with a shared private key?

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but it is my understanding that any key based encryption can't be broken without knowledge of the private key anyway. This is not true. Many encyption algorithms (that were used in the past) can be broken without previous knowledge of the private key. Especially if the key is small. –  ypercube May 15 '11 at 12:46
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@Ben: Out of curiosity, why must the scheme use an explicitly shared key? Why not just use TLS/SSL? –  SimonJ May 15 '11 at 13:36
    
@SimonJ: Errr, I don't really know to be honest, for some reason I completely missed the ball on that one. If I use SSL there is no chance of packet sniffing or finding out what is being transferred and all the encryption stuff is managed by Java - is that correct? If it is, it looks like I should be using SSL rather than doing it manually. What are the disadvantages of SSL; if any at all? –  Cheetah May 15 '11 at 15:52
    
@SimonJ: Also, won't that mean I'd have to deal with certificates and things like that and the user would have to generate their own certificate to run the software? –  Cheetah May 15 '11 at 16:25
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TLS/SSL is the easiest approach to get right, since Java takes care of algorithm choice, padding, block cipher modes, key negotiation and so on. You'll need a server certificate so clients can ensure they're talking directly to the server, avoiding man-in-the-middle attacks; not verifying server certificates is probably the most common flaw in code using TLS/SSL. You can use certificates to identify clients, but it's not essential if you have another way (e.g. username/password). –  SimonJ May 15 '11 at 17:06

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up vote 3 down vote accepted

it is my understanding that any key based encryption can't be broken without knowledge of the private key anyway

That's not even close to true. A lousy algorithm absolutely can be broken without knowledge of the private key.

Anyhow, if there's a shared key, consider AES.

And read up on the JCE/JCA as Java can do AES and other types of encryption out of the box. Much better than rolling your own.

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Will AES be computationally expensive on devices like Blackberry and Android? Does reducing the key length mean it will be "faster" at decrypting/encrypting? (but obviously making it less secure) –  Cheetah May 15 '11 at 13:23

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