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I have a function which given a set of students and their grades, makes a categorization:

students = {"Good student":"A","Bad Student":"D","Average student":"C"}
student_cat = ["Best","So-so","Below average"]

And my function works like this:

categorize(students,student_cat) do |s,g|
   # s would be "Good student" and g would be "Best"
   # s would be "Bad student" and g would be "Below average"
   # s would be "Average student" and g would be "So-so"
end

Right now I'm testing it like this:

  categorize(students,student_cat) do |s,g|
       assert g == "Best" if s == "Good student"
       assert g == "Below average" if s == "Bad student"
       assert g == "So-so" if s == "Average student"
  end

Is there another way of testing functions take blocks as parameters? Is this a good enough way?

share|improve this question
1  
I don't know if it's the majority opinion, but IMO blocks which return collections should not work by yielding its elements, this leads to imperative coding (see Wayne's answer, for example). So normally: 1) return a simple array, or 2) if you expect long outputs, return an enumerator (which is lazy) – tokland May 15 '11 at 14:09

That'll work fine. You can make the test a little more strict, though, if you use the block to collect the results, and then assert the entire result:

results = []
categorize(students,student_cat) do |s,g|
  results << [s, g]
end
assert results == [
  ["Good student", "Best"],
  ["Bad Student", "Below average"],
  ["Average student", "So-so"],
]

That way the function can't yield some nonsense along with the proper results and have it go undetected.

If the function may return its results in any order, then sort results before comparing it:

assert results.sort == [
  ["Average student", "So-so"],
  ["Bad Student", "Below average"],
  ["Good student", "Best"],
]
share|improve this answer
1  
There is a nicer way of collecting yielded data: results = enum_for(:categorize, students, cat).to_a. Also, it's advisable to use assert_equal, it gives more meaningful error messages. – tokland May 15 '11 at 13:52
    
@tokland, enum_for, very nice, I didn't know. I agree about asesrt_equal, although the questioner didn't say which unit testing framework he's using. – Wayne Conrad May 15 '11 at 14:06

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