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I have the MD5 hash for a String, stored as a String. I'm writing a small program to find out the original string by brute force.

I'd like to loop through a subset of char.

The code below works for when String.length() == 0.

I can't figure out how to edit this code to work with variable-length Strings. I feel like I'm on the right track with recursion, but can't go any further.

I have the following code:

    public void attempt(String initial, String md5) {

    for (char c = ' '; c < '~'; ++c) {
        attempt = initial + Character.toString(c);
        generatedMd5 = generateMD5(attempt);
        System.out.println(attempt);
        if (hashesMatch(md5, generatedMd5)) {
            break;
        } else attempt(attempt, md5);
    }
}

Note: I should mention this is for an academic study on MD5.

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3  
In case that's your actual code not a sample, you need add a depth check in there (otherwise you'll only ever generate strings full of spaces until you run out of stack) and you need to return success on the match, and test for this in your call to attempt so that you actually stop when you've found a match. But you probably want to look into optimising the MD5 function as much as possible, or some way to run hashes in parallel across many CPUs or a GPU - that's your slowest step by far here. Except for odd simple cases you'll never find a match like this - it'll take too long. – Rup May 15 '11 at 14:18
    
Please fix the source code you show, it is incomplete. – Vincent May 15 '11 at 14:22
    
I fixed the wording for the first parapraph – leonbloy May 15 '11 at 14:29
1  
run some calculations first about the number of MD5 checks you would need to run. Take a rough estimate on how long an MD5 takes -> Be amazed about how long your calculation will take. – Jochen Bedersdorfer May 15 '11 at 17:09
up vote 6 down vote accepted

You are doing a "Depth first" search (and of unlimited depth!), this is almost guaranteed to fail ( exhausting your stack) if you do not add some depth check.

You should probably better might want to do a Breadth first search : your loop should first try all the combinations that results in adding a character, and only then, if no success, try to recursively call the method with each augmented string.

In any case, you should add some depth check, always.

Edited: thinking it twice, I'm not so sure you should not stick with depth first. Breadth first is only rasonable here for small depths and combinations (character ranges). A possible implementation

  // Breadth first returns null if not found
  public String bruteforce(List<String> prefixes, String md5,int availdepth) {
    if(availabledepth<0) return null;
    List<String> newprefixes = new ArrayList<String>();
    for(String prefix : prefixes) {
        for (char c = ' '; c < '~'; ++c) {
          String attempt = prefix + Character.toString(c);
          generatedMd5 = generateMD5(attempt);
          if (hashesMatch(md5, generatedMd5)) 
            return attempt;
          newprefixes.add(attempt);
       }
    }
    // no success in this level go for next
    return bruteforce(newprefixes,md5,availddepth-1);
  }


  // Depth first - returns null if not found
  public String bruteforce(String prefix, String md5,int availdepth) {
    if(availdepth <= 0) return null;
    for (char c = ' '; c < '~'; ++c) {
          String attempt = prefix + Character.toString(c);
          if (hashesMatch(md5, generateMD5(attempt))) 
            return attempt;
          String res = bruteforce(attempt, md5, availdepth-1);
          if(res != null) return res;
       }
    return null;
  }
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I'm not sure I understand the implication. I added a depth check of 100, but ended up with a long string of 100 spaces. How do I modify it to attempt: a, b, c, aa, ab, ac, ba... and so on? – Redandwhite May 15 '11 at 15:37
    
Your implementation works perfectly. Many thanks! – Redandwhite May 15 '11 at 17:28
    
You're welcome. But bear in mind that this has an exponential space growth with depth, it might be efficient only for small sizes. Elsewhere, go for the original (depth first) approach- – leonbloy May 15 '11 at 17:58
    
duly noted. A simple 3-character String takes 10+ seconds. Curiously, spaces are solved much, much faster. This is undoubtedly due to them being "first" in the char sequence – Redandwhite May 15 '11 at 18:24
    
I added a depth breath implementation - untested – leonbloy May 15 '11 at 18:33

first of you don't return a result...

second you are doing depth first on a infinite space (it's never going to end...)

public String attempt(String initial, String md5,int depth) {
    if(depth < 0)return null;//failed backtrack
    for (char c = ' '; c < '~'; ++c) {
        attempt = initial + Character.toString(c);
        generatedMd5 = generateMD5(attempt);
        System.out.println(attempt);
        if (hashesMatch(md5, generatedMd5)) {
            return attempt;//success
        } else {
            String res = attempt(attempt, md5,depth-1);
            if(res!=null)return res;
        }
    }
}

this is a bounded depth first meaning it won't recurse further than depth (and return null when it can't find anything

the following can be used to go over the entire space up to depth 10000

String attempt(String initial,String md5){
    for(int i = 5;i<10000;i++){
        String res = attempt(initial,md5,i);
        if(res!= null)return res;
    }
    return null;//let's not go overboard on recursion
}

I put a max size on the recursion on 10000 to make it end sometime in the foreseeable future

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