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Answer: it was in the else code, but I thought there is no reason that code wouldn't point to that line.

Can someone offer an idea how it could be possible that I get "Object reference not set to an instance of an object" on this at Invoke method:

delegate void t(tabdescriptor tab);
internal void AddItem(tabdesciptor tab)
{
    if (InvokeRequired)
    {
        t inv = new t(AddItem);
        if (inv != null && tab!= null)
            Invoke(inv, tab);
    }
    else
    {
        ....
    }
}
share|improve this question
1  
What is your call stack at the time of the exception? – hsmiths May 15 '11 at 18:05
7  
That code won't compile, for a start. You can't create a delegate from just an object as you've tried to with new t(o). Please give a short but complete example. – Jon Skeet May 15 '11 at 18:05
1  
what is the value of tab? It seems that this is never set – Felipe Sabino May 15 '11 at 18:05
1  
t inv = new t(tab); is still nonsense, please post something that compiles. – Henk Holterman May 15 '11 at 18:18
2  
-1 If you can't or won't paste your real code then develop a prototype project to demonstrate your problem and make sure that replicates your failing behavior. Making up fake code is just wasting everyone's time. – Peter Oehlert May 15 '11 at 18:29
up vote 3 down vote accepted

I'm not exactly sure what the actual issue is considering your example cannot be the code that executes, but please try something like this:

internal void AddItem(tabdesciptor tab)
{
    if (InvokeRequired)
    {
        Invoke(new Action<tabdescriptor>(AddItem), tab);
    }
    else
    {
        //...
    }
}

Also please make sure that it's not actually whatever is in the else part that fails.

share|improve this answer
    
Unfortunately, it raises the same exception. – Ivan Ičin May 15 '11 at 18:28
1  
@Ivan: and you are sure it's not the else part that fails? – SirViver May 15 '11 at 18:31
    
It is the else part, I see it now. – Ivan Ičin May 15 '11 at 18:33

If I remember correctly, this exception could be coming from inside the invoked method. If you place a try/catch inside the else of the AddItem method and a breakpoint inside the catch, do you catch the exception?

internal void AddItem(tabdesciptor tab)
{
    if (InvokeRequired)
    {
        t inv = new t(AddItem);
        if (inv != null && tab!= null)
            Invoke(inv, tab);
    }
    else
    {
        try
        {
            ....
        }
        catch
        {
            // breakpoint here
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yes it is, but I think the answer above was first, so I'll mark it as answer – Ivan Ičin May 15 '11 at 18:33

It's unclear whether it's a mistake in the given example, or not, but tab is never checked for null, yet it is passed as the argument.

Either it's probably null, or:

Also, inv is checked for null right after creating it (Good in C/C++, but unnecessary in C# as it throws an OutOfMemoryException upon failure), but it is done before checking o for null.

share|improve this answer
    
No, I've updated, I just switched tab to o to be more generic, but forgot one instance. – Ivan Ičin May 15 '11 at 18:10
    
tab is still unchecked, and now o is undeclared but still checked for null. – pickypg May 15 '11 at 18:11
    
OK, I've updated in the browser instead of using find and replace and forgot one instance. But it is checked. – Ivan Ičin May 15 '11 at 18:15
1  
You will need to show us the real method. – pickypg May 15 '11 at 18:24

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