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Here is a image from the ANTS memory profiler. It seens that there are a lot of objects hold in memory. How can I find what I am doing wrong?

ANTS memory profiler

**UPDATE**

Here is my repository classes:

public class Repository<T> : IRepository<T> where T : class, IDataEntity
    {
        ObjectContext _context;
        IObjectSet<T> _objectSet;

        readonly string _entitySetName;
        readonly string[] _keyNames;

        private ObjectContext Context
        {
            get
            {
                if (_context == null)
                {
                    _context = GetCurrentUnitOfWork<EFUnitOfWork>().Context;
                }
                return _context;
            }
        }

        private IObjectSet<T> ObjectSet
        {
            get
            {
                if (_objectSet == null)
                {
                    _objectSet = this.Context.CreateObjectSet<T>();
                }
                return _objectSet;
            }
        }

        public TUnitOfWork GetCurrentUnitOfWork<TUnitOfWork>() where TUnitOfWork : IUnitOfWork
        {
            return (TUnitOfWork)UnitOfWork.Current;
        }

        public virtual IEnumerable<T> GetQuery()
        {
            return ObjectSet;
        }

        public virtual IEnumerable<T> GetQuery(params Expression<Func<T, object>>[] includes)
        {
            return ObjectSet.IncludeMultiple(includes);
        }

        public virtual IEnumerable<T> GetQuery(
            IEnumerable<Expression<Func<T, bool>>> filters,
            Func<IQueryable<T>, IOrderedQueryable<T>> orderBy,
            IEnumerable<Expression<Func<T, object>>> includes)
        {
            IQueryable<T> _query = ObjectSet;

            if (filters != null)
            {
                foreach (var filter in filters)
                {
                    _query = _query.Where(filter);
                }
            }

            if (includes != null && includes.Count() > 0)
            {
                _query = _query.IncludeMultiple(includes.ToArray());
            }

            if (orderBy != null)
            {
                _query = orderBy(_query);
            }

            return _query;
        }

        public virtual IPaged<T> GetQuery(
            IEnumerable<Expression<Func<T, bool>>> filters,
            Func<IQueryable<T>, IOrderedQueryable<T>> orderBy,
            int pageNumber, int pageSize,
            IEnumerable<Expression<Func<T, object>>> includes)
        {
            IQueryable<T> _query = ObjectSet;

            if (filters != null)
            {
                foreach (var filter in filters)
                {
                    _query = _query.Where(filter);
                }
            }

            if (orderBy != null)
            {
                _query = orderBy(_query);
            }

            IPaged<T> page = new Paged<T>(_query, pageNumber, pageSize, includes);

            return page;
        }

        public virtual void Insert(T entity)
        {
            this.ObjectSet.AddObject(entity);
        }

        public virtual void Delete(T entity)
        {
            if (entity is ISoftDeletable)
            {
                ((ISoftDeletable)entity).IsDeleted = true;
                //Update(entity);
            }
            else
            {
                this.ObjectSet.DeleteObject(entity);
            }
        }

        public virtual void Attach(T entity)
        {
            ObjectStateEntry entry = null;
            if (this.Context.ObjectStateManager.TryGetObjectStateEntry(entity, out entry) == false)
            {
                this.ObjectSet.Attach(entity);
            }
        }

        public virtual void Detach(T entity)
        {
            ObjectStateEntry entry = null;
            if (this.Context.ObjectStateManager.TryGetObjectStateEntry(entity, out entry) == true)
            {
                this.ObjectSet.Detach(entity);
            }
        }
    }

Now, if I have class A that holds records from table A, I also create class:

public class ARepository:BaseRepository<A> {
// Implementation of A's queries and specific db operations
}

Here is my EFUnitOfWork class:

public class EFUnitOfWork : IUnitOfWork, IDisposable
{
    public ObjectContext Context { get; private set; }

    public EFUnitOfWork(ObjectContext context)
    {
        Context = context;
        context.ContextOptions.LazyLoadingEnabled = true;
    }

    public void Commit()
    {
        Context.SaveChanges();
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        if (Context != null)
        {
            Context.Dispose();
        }
        GC.SuppressFinalize(this);
    }
}

And UnitOfWork class:

public static class UnitOfWork
{
    private const string HTTPCONTEXTKEY = "MyProj.Domain.Business.Repository.HttpContext.Key";

    private static IUnitOfWorkFactory _unitOfWorkFactory;
    private static readonly Hashtable _threads = new Hashtable();

    public static void Commit()
    {
        IUnitOfWork unitOfWork = GetUnitOfWork();
        if (unitOfWork != null)
        {
            unitOfWork.Commit();
        }
    }

    public static IUnitOfWork Current 
    {
        get
        {
            IUnitOfWork unitOfWork = GetUnitOfWork();
            if (unitOfWork == null)
            {
                _unitOfWorkFactory = ObjectFactory.GetInstance<IUnitOfWorkFactory>();
                unitOfWork = _unitOfWorkFactory.Create();
                SaveUnitOfWork(unitOfWork);
            }
            return unitOfWork;
        }
    }

    private static IUnitOfWork GetUnitOfWork()
    {
        if (HttpContext.Current != null)
        {
            if (HttpContext.Current.Items.Contains(HTTPCONTEXTKEY))
            {
                return (IUnitOfWork)HttpContext.Current.Items[HTTPCONTEXTKEY];
            }
            return null;
        }
        else
        {
            Thread thread = Thread.CurrentThread;
            if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(thread.Name))
            {
                thread.Name = Guid.NewGuid().ToString();
                return null;
            }
            else
            {
                lock (_threads.SyncRoot)
                {
                    return (IUnitOfWork)_threads[Thread.CurrentThread.Name];
                }
            }
        }
    }

    private static void SaveUnitOfWork(IUnitOfWork unitOfWork)
    {
        if (HttpContext.Current != null)
        {
            HttpContext.Current.Items[HTTPCONTEXTKEY] = unitOfWork;
        }
        else
        {
            lock(_threads.SyncRoot)
            {
                _threads[Thread.CurrentThread.Name] = unitOfWork;
            }
        }
    }
}

Here is how I use this:

 public class TaskPriceRepository : BaseRepository<TaskPrice>
    {
        public void Set(TaskPrice entity)
        {
            TaskPrice taskPrice = GetQuery().SingleOrDefault(x => x.TaskId == entity.TaskId);
            if (taskPrice != null)
            {
                CommonUtils.CopyObject<TaskPrice>(entity, ref taskPrice);
            }
            else
            {
                this.Insert(entity);
            }
        }
    }

public class BranchRepository : BaseRepository<Branch>
{
    public IList<Branch> GetBranchesList(Guid companyId, long? branchId, string branchName)
    {
        return Repository.GetQuery().
            Where(b => companyId == b.CompanyId).
            Where(b => b.IsDeleted == false).
            Where(b => !branchId.HasValue || b.BranchId.Equals(branchId.Value)).
            Where(b => branchName == null || b.BranchName.Contains(branchName)).
            ToList();
    }
}

[WebMethod]
public void SetTaskPrice(TaskPriceDTO taskPrice)
{
    TaskPrice tp = taskPrice.ToEntity();
    TaskPriceRepository rep = new TaskPriceRepository();
    rep.Set(tp);
    UnitOfWork.Commit();
}

[WebMethod]
public IList<Branch> GetBranchesList()
{
    BranchRepository rep = new BranchRepository();
    return rep.GetBranchesList(m_User.UserCompany.CompanyId, null, null).ToList();
}

I hope this is enough info to help me solving the problem. Thanks.

UPDATE 2
There is also UnitOfWorkFactory that initializes UnitOfWork:

public class UnitOfWorkFactory : IUnitOfWorkFactory
{
    private static Func<ObjectContext> _objectContextDelegate;
    private static readonly Object _lockObject = new object();

    public static void SetObjectContext(Func<ObjectContext> objectContextDelegate)
    {
        _objectContextDelegate = objectContextDelegate;
    }

    public IUnitOfWork Create()
    {
        ObjectContext context;
        lock (_lockObject)
        {
             context = _objectContextDelegate();
        }
        return new EFUnitOfWork(context);
    }
}

In order to use this, in the application startup I use structuremap:

  ObjectFactory.Initialize(x =>
        {
            x.For<IUnitOfWorkFactory>().Use<UnitOfWorkFactory>();
            x.For(typeof(IRepository<>)).Use(typeof(Repository<>));
        });
share|improve this question
2  
What do your queries look like? SELECT * FROM LargeTable ? –  Henk Holterman May 15 '11 at 18:17
    
Additionally, what do your EF queries look like? Are you accidentally pulling many entities into memory when you only need a few? –  Julie Lerman May 15 '11 at 18:35
    
You must describe what you are doing with EF, what type of application are you building and how you work with entities. Otherwise this question is candidate to be closed as not a real question because we cannot answer it. –  Ladislav Mrnka May 15 '11 at 19:14
    
@Ladislav Mrnka: I am thinking what to post. I have planty of code.. I believe that select query will not tell much, I will post something. –  Naor May 15 '11 at 20:10
    
@Ladislav Mrnka, @Henk Holterman, @Julie Lerman: I added more info. –  Naor May 15 '11 at 20:24
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3 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

I have a hunch you don't dispose the context.
I suggest disposing the context whenever you done interacting with database.

Use using statement whenever you create the context.

[Edit]

As far as I can see, you cache and don't dispose your EFUnitOfWork object. It is disposable, which is correct, but I don't see when disposable is called. Seems like you hold a reference to the context for all application run time.
Moreover, you create and hold one context per thread, which will make it even worse.

I can't tell you for sure where you should put Dispose or using, as I don't know the usages.
You could put it probably to your Commit method, but I don't know if the Commit called only once during database interaction session.

Also, your design might be overcomplicated.

If I were you, I would:

  • Find the way to dispose the context using current code, as a short-term solution
  • Simplify the design, as the long-term solution

If I had time I would do long-term solution right away.
But again, I can't tell if the complexity of your design is justified, as I don't know how big your application is and what it does and what the requirements are.

share|improve this answer
    
While this is excellent advice for web apps and service operations (and other specific architectures) I wouldn't necessarily suggest that for every scenario (using and dispose). It depends on what the app is doing and what is creating the problem. There are client app scenarios where it is helpful to keep the context around (while keeping an eye on memory usage and abuse of EF cache). OTOH if this is a web app or service, .NET will toss the context any time the containing class instance goes out of scope. –  Julie Lerman May 15 '11 at 18:38
    
@Julie - I agree that in some scenarios it would be preferable to keep context. However, I think that in the most scenarios it is more robust, scalable and less bug prone to dispose as soon as you can. –  Alex Aza May 15 '11 at 18:43
    
@Alex Aza: Please see updates –  Naor May 15 '11 at 20:26
    
@Naor - Not clear from your code how EFUnitOfWork is instantiated. –  Alex Aza May 16 '11 at 6:37
    
@Alex Aza: You right - I updated the code with the factory that creates the UnitOfWork. –  Naor May 16 '11 at 9:20
show 2 more comments

Do you clear the ObjectContext once in a while. If you keep an ObjectContext alive for a long time this will consume memory related to the size of the EntityDataModel and the number of Entities loaded into this ObjectContext.

share|improve this answer
    
Please see updates –  Naor May 15 '11 at 20:26
    
@Naor: Just as Alex Aza is assuming. I don't see any disposal of the objectcontext / EFUnitOfwork. @Alex Aza: I agree with you that the design looks pretty overcomplicated. –  YoupTube May 17 '11 at 10:14
add comment

Couple of things come to my mind:

  • You aren't probably Disposing the ObjectContext. Make sure all your database codes are within using(var context = CreateObjectContext()) block
  • You have an N-tier architecture and you are passing entities from the data access layer to upper layer without Detaching the entities from ObjectContext. You need to call ObjectContext.Detach(...)
  • You are most likely returning a full collection of entities, instead of returning a single enity for single Get operations. For ex, you have queries like from customer in context.Customers select customer instead of doing from customer in context.Customers select customer.FirstOrDefault()

I have had hard time making Entity Framework to work in an N-tier application. It's just not suitable for using in N-tier apps as is. Only EF 4.0 is. You can read about all my adventure in making EF 3 work in an N-tier app.

http://www.codeproject.com/KB/linq/ef.aspx

Does this answer your question?

share|improve this answer
    
@Omar AL Zabir: How do you know I am using N-Tire architecture? which architecture do you recommend? –  Naor May 15 '11 at 20:12
    
@Omar AL Zabir: Please see updates –  Naor May 15 '11 at 20:24
    
Looking at your code, yes, there's no dispose. The UnitOfWork creates a Objectcontext on the current thread, but then it does not Dispose it. –  Omar AL Zabir May 18 '11 at 10:49
    
I usually do this in my web app: On Application_EndRequest, I loop through all items in HttpContext.Items and see which ones are IDisposable and call their Dispose method. This will then clean all UnitOfWork. But even more architectural concern is, UnitOfWork should not be stored in Context. You can have UnitOfWork originate anywhere. It can originate on a business layer, inside some business facade method maybe. UnitOfwork is used within a using(...) block to clearly mark where the work starts and where the work ends. –  Omar AL Zabir May 18 '11 at 10:49
    
@Omar AL Zabir: What are the reasons UnitOfWork should not be stored in Context? –  Naor May 18 '11 at 11:22
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