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I was trying to use a class with psuedo class in the less css mixin

a:link{
    color:#138CB4;
    text-decoration:none;
}
a:visited{
    a:link;
    color:#84B6CD;
}

But out put I got is this, which an invalid css

a:link{
    color: #138CB4;
    text-decoration: none;
}
a:visited{
    a: link;
    color: #84B6CD;
}

Am I missing something here or mixins don't support pseudo classes yet.

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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I don't believe that is how you use mixin's in Less.

You have defined the link pseudo class and then nested it under the visited pseudo class. This doesn't actually mean anything and is why your are getting that output.

If I think what you are aiming for is to re-use your link styles across :visited and :link, you actually will want this:

.link {
  color: #138CB4;
  text-decoration: none;
}

a:link {
  .link;
}

a:visited{
  .link;
  color: #84B6CD;
}
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In the lesscss documentation it is written "Any CSS class, id or element ruleset can be mixed-in that way". Thats why I was trying, if I can reuse styles from an element with pseudo class. –  Saneef May 16 '11 at 14:57
    
You can't reuse styles from an element, but you can use an id. For example - a {color:#138CB4; text-decoration:none; } a:visited{ a; color:#84B6CD;} - doesn't work either but #coolname {color:#138CB4; text-decoration:none; } a:visited{ #coolname; color:#84B6CD;} does. So, I would raise a bug. –  Kinlan May 16 '11 at 16:10
    
Thanks @Kinlan, I was trying for these kind of element or element with pseudo class reuse. Got to know don't works yet. :) –  Saneef May 17 '11 at 4:34
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I was a little confused by this at first, too, and found myself jumping through hoops to get it to work. Although your post is old enough that it might pre-date this functionality for all I know.

Anyway, if you're just trying to add additional styles to an existing style via pseudo-selectors, you can use the '&' operator. It works kind of like a 'this' keyword, and turns nesting into a simple combination. So you should be able to do:

a {
  color: #138CB4;
  text-decoration: none;

  &:visited {
    color: #84B6CD;
  }
}

This should compile out to something like:

a {
  color: #138CB4;
  text-decoration: none;
}

a:visited {
    color: #84B6CD;
}

Note that you can also use the & to combine 'sub-selectors':

.outer {
  color: blue;

  .error {
    //this will select elements that are .error inside-of/descending-from .outer
  }

  &.error {
    //This will select elements that are .outer AND .error
    color: red;
  }
}

The official definition is unfortunately hiding in plain sight in the Nesting Rules part of the documentation.

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