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Let's say I have the following code:

struct Z;

struct A
{
  virtual void Do (Z & z) const;
};

struct B : public A {};

struct Z
{
  void use (A const & a) {}
  void use (B const & b) {}
};


void A::Do(Z& z) const{
  z.use(*this);
}

Right now, when I call B.do, the type of this is A, which make sense, because the implementation of do is defined in A.

Is there any way to have calls to B.do use use (B const &) without having to copy-paste the same code for do from A into B? In my actual code I have about 15 (and growing) classes derived from some base class and it seems a waste having to copy-paste the identical code for do everytime.

[Edit] Clarification: all Do does is call use, nothing else. Do and use are the accept & visit functions from the Visitor pattern.

share|improve this question
    
If do always does the same, why is it virtual? Also, do as a function name is a syntax error since do is a reserved keyword. :) –  Xeo May 15 '11 at 20:39
    
So is use. And there are other problems. –  Beta May 15 '11 at 20:44
    
@Beta: use isn't a reserved keyword in C or C++. Also, fixed the code to make it compilable. –  Xeo May 15 '11 at 20:45
    
@Xeo: sorry, my mistake. –  Beta May 15 '11 at 20:50
    
@Xeo & @Beta Those were just example names I made up :). –  Darhuuk May 15 '11 at 20:50
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4 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Since you now clarified that what you want is the visitor pattern, well, sorry, but that's just how it is. This answer shows how the visitor pattern with double dispatch works.


I thought of a nice way using CRTP, but this may or may not work for you, depending on the circumstances.
(Note: I used the code from the linked answer, so the names don't match, but I hope you get the idea.)

// your Z
class Visitor;

// superclass needed for generic handling
struct Superbase{
  virtual void Accept(Visitor& v) = 0;
};

// your A
template<class Der>
class Base : public Superbase{
public:
    void Accept(Visitor& v){
        v.Visit(static_cast<Der&>(*this));
    }
};

// your B
class Derived1 : public Base<Derived1> {
};

// new C
class Derived2 : public Base<Derived1> {
};

class Visitor {
public:
    virtual void Visit(Superbase& sup){
      // generic handling of any Superbase-derived type
    }

    virtual void Visit(Derived1& d1){
      // handle Derived1
    }

    virtual void Visit(Derived2& d2){
      // handle Derived1
    }
};

int main(){
    Visitor v;
    Derived1 d1;
    d1.Accept(v);
}

The only problem: Now you're missing the chance to have a generic handle to any type of A, since functions can't be both virtual and templates. :|
Scrape that, found a solution using a Superbase base class. :) This even allows you to have a container of Superbases and take full advantage of polymorphism. :)

share|improve this answer
    
@Xeo This would indeed be a nice solution; weren't it for the problem you mention that virtual & templates don't match. Unfortunately, I really need handles to A. –  Darhuuk May 15 '11 at 21:19
    
@Darhuuk: Well, then I think you need to accept, that you need to override in the base classes. :/ Edit or wait, I'm thinking of something... –  Xeo May 15 '11 at 21:23
    
@Darhook, @Xeo: That's not actually true. Go ahead and declare Accept to be virtual. It'll work just fine. If you just derive the Base template from some class like RealBase that has a pure virtual Accept function then you'll have your base that you can use to refer to instances all of your derived classes. –  Omnifarious May 15 '11 at 21:28
    
@Omnifarious: Hehe, look at my edit I made while you commented. ;) That's what the "or wait, ..." was for in my previous comment. :) –  Xeo May 15 '11 at 21:30
    
@Darhuuk: Take a lookie at the edit. :) –  Xeo May 15 '11 at 21:31
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I think this code does what you want:

#include <iostream>

struct A;
struct B;

struct Z
{
    void use (A const & a);
    void use (B const & b);
};

template<typename DERIVED>
struct XX
{
    void Do(Z& z){
        Do(z,THIS());
    }
private:
    const DERIVED& THIS() const { return static_cast<const DERIVED&>(*this); }
    void Do(Z& z, const DERIVED& t){
        z.use(t);
    }
};

struct A : public XX<A> {};
struct B : public XX<B> {};

void Z::use (A const & a) { std::cout << "use for A" << std::endl; }
void Z::use (B const & b) { std::cout << "use for B" << std::endl; }

int main(){

    A a;
    B b;
    Z z;
    a.Do(z);
    b.Do(z);
    return 0;
}

The only 'maintenance' or 'boiler-plate' part of the code is to derive from the template class templated on your own type.

share|improve this answer
    
Meh, this answer appeared while I was editing. :| +1 for the same idea! See my answer for the remark on the drawback this introduces. –  Xeo May 15 '11 at 21:16
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You need to dispatch the call of use based on the type pointed to by this so you need to add another virtual function to A and B that simply invokes the correct use. I assume that do does other things than call use of course otherwise you would indeed have to re-implement do in each subclass. It would look like this

struct A
{
  virtual void Do (Z & z) const
  {
    // do stuff

    use(z);

    // do more stuff
  }

  virtual void use(Z & z) const
  {
    z.use(*this);
  }
};

struct B : public A
{
  virtual void use(Z & z) const
  {
    z.use(*this);
  }
};

struct Z
{
  void use (A const & a) {}
  void use (B const & b) {}
};
share|improve this answer
    
Well, that basically is what the OP does not want - "it seems a waste having to copy-paste the identical code for do everytime". –  Xeo May 15 '11 at 20:43
    
@Xeo: Yes, but this answer demonstrates it need not be the entire code of the method do that is copied. –  Troubadour May 15 '11 at 20:44
    
As Xeo pointed out, this is what I'm trying to avoid. In fact, all do does is call use, in the actual code do and use are accept & visit functions (Visitor pattern). –  Darhuuk May 15 '11 at 20:52
    
@Darhuuk: So you were asking if there is a way of doing something but forgot to mention that nobody was allowed to answer saying "No"? I'm sorry it's not what you wanted to hear. –  Troubadour May 15 '11 at 21:03
    
I'm sorry if I somehow insulted you somehow. I'm perfectly fine with a "No" answer, it's better than not knowing at all. –  Darhuuk May 15 '11 at 21:22
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I think I have to disappoint you and say no. This is the trade off you have to make, in order for you to break out the interface from your classes into the visitor. The visitor must know which one is reporting to it, as long as you don't override the virtual Do() in the base class, the visitor will treat you as A.

Please someone prove me wrong! (I'd also see this solved to remove redundancy)

share|improve this answer
    
Just a comment to notify you of a solution, since you wanted to be proved wrong. :) See my answer. –  Xeo May 17 '11 at 5:09
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