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i was wondering if somebody could help me on my diff function. its supposed to find the diff between 2 inputs. the function takes in 2 arrays so if array 1 has.. "word1", "word2" and array 2 has "word1", "word2", and "word3", it should just return "word3". it works for the most part, but with the certain input below, it doesn't work.

function diff(a1, a2) {

if (a1.length > a2.length
       || a1.length == a2.length) {
    return [""];
}
a1 = a1.slice(0);
a2 = a2.slice(0);


for (i = 0; i < a1.length; i++) {
    for (k = 0; k < a2.length; k++) {
        if (a1[i] == a2[k]) {
            a1.splice(i, 1);
            a2.splice(k, 1);
        }
    }
}

for (j = 0; j < a2.length; j++) {
    for (p = 0; p < a1.length; p++) {
        if (a2[j] == a1[p]) {
            a2.splice(p, 1);
            a1.splice(j, 1);
        }
    }
}


a1 = a1.concat(a2);
return a1;
}

var s1 = ["one", "two", "three", "four",];
var s2 = ["one", "two", "three", "four", "five"];


document.write(diff(s1, s2));

the answer should just return "five", but its returning "four", "four", "five". help would be much appreciated. im super stuck. thanks a bunch!

share|improve this question
    
Could you elaborate on what your algorithm is supposed to do? Your two examples cover little ground. –  entonio May 15 '11 at 23:43
    
You're creating lots of globals in your diff function by omitting var before your looping variables, hope you don't do that with production code. –  Juan Mendes Jun 30 '11 at 19:59

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

As far as I understand, you want to return an array containing only differing elements from both. Try it this way, without complex double loops and splices and whatnot:

function diff(a1, a2) {

  var aa1 = {}, aa2 = {}, res = [];

  // create an object from a1, containing value:array-index pairs:
  for (var i = 0; i < a1.length; i++) {
      aa1[a1[i]] = i;
  }
  // create an object from a2 like the one from a1
  for (var i = 0; i < a2.length; i++) {
      aa2[a2[i]] = i;
  }
  /**
    * loop through the first object (from a1)
    * if a value in this object is not found in 
    * the object from a2, push that value to 
    * the result array (res)
   */
  for (var l in aa1){
    if (aa1.hasOwnProperty(l) && !(l in aa2)) {
        res.push(a1[aa1[l]]);
    }
  }
  /**
    * but the second array can also contain
    * values differing from the values in the first.
    * So, repeat the above for the object created 
    * from a2
   */
  for (var l in aa2){
   if (aa2.hasOwnProperty(l) && !(l in aa1)) {
        res.push(a2[aa2[l]]);
   }
 }
 /**
   * now res contains all different values
   * note: double values are not counted
   * so ['one','two','tree'] vs ['one','two','four','four']
   * will return ['tree','four']
   * note2: if you want to find the first difference,
   * return res[0]
   */

 return res;
}

If it's just the first difference you want to find, this (array only) method will do:

function diff(a1, a2) {
  var firstdiff = null, i = -1;

  /**
    * local function to check if value [val] 
    * exists in array [arr]. Called from
    * within the loops
    */
  function check(val,arr){
      var i = -1;
      while(++i<arr.length){
          if(val === arr[i]){ return true;}
      }
      return false;
  }
  // loop a1 and check values vs a2-values
  while (++i<a1.length){
    if (!check(a1[i],a2)) {
      return firstdiff = a1[i];
    }
  }
  // no difference found, continue a2 vs a1
  i = -1;
  while (++i<a2.length){
    if (!check(a2[i],a1)) {
      return firstdiff = a2[i];;
    }
  }
  // there are no differences, firstdiff = null
  return firstdiff;
}
share|improve this answer
    
oh wow, your code above works really well! would you mind explaining it for me? its kinda hard for me to understand. thanks a bunch! = ) –  Sasha May 16 '11 at 0:26
    
Hi Crystal, check the comments I placed in the code. –  KooiInc May 16 '11 at 0:57
    
very helpful! thanks a bunch! –  Sasha May 16 '11 at 18:35

The problem is that array.splice reduces the length of the array thus making the for loop skip over elements. Possible solution is to decrement the iterator.

EDIT:

When you splice the array it removes elements from the array making it shorter. So lets assume we are running this code:

test_array = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5];
for(i = 0; i < test_array.length; i++) {
    document.write(test_array[i]);
    if(i == 2) {
        test_array.splice(i, 1);
    }
}

you can see that it outputs 1235, rather than 12345. That would be because when i = 2 and the element is removed, all the elements in the array have their index recalculated. So if before the splice the array is:

  • [0] = 1
  • [1] = 2
  • [2] = 3
  • [3] = 4
  • [4] = 5

after it becomes:

  • [0] = 1
  • [1] = 2
  • [2] = 4
  • [3] = 5

Meanwhile the for loop moves on to i = 3 but instead of test_array[3] being 4, it is now 5, thus the number 4 was skipped over.

An easy solutions for this is you can decrement the iterator.

Example:

test_array = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5];
for(i = 0; i < test_array.length; i++) {
    document.write(test_array[i]);
    if(i == 2) {
        test_array.splice(i, 1);
        i--;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Oh i'm not really sure what you meant by that. Don't you want the array to shrink in size after the element is removed? What is it skipping over if the element is removed? Don't you want it to go the next element? Thanks! –  Sasha May 16 '11 at 0:28
    
I did my original answer on my phone, I have now elaborated. –  exahex May 16 '11 at 1:29
    
oh cool. thanks a bunch! that was helpful why splice skips over an index. im still not sure how the copies of the array works. wouldnt that skip over the index as well? even though youre splicing the original copy, if i increments to the next index, and in copy array it happens to have another duplicate, it will delete the element next to the shifted down element (you want to delete the shifted element i believe) –  Sasha May 16 '11 at 18:45
    
AAAAH, you are right the copy array one won't work in this instance, I totally screwed that up lol, good catch. But yeah, it would end up deleting the wrong element in the original array if it splices more than once. –  exahex May 16 '11 at 21:43
    
@Crystal, first double loop: at i=0 k=0 "one"=="one" so each is removed; at i=0 k=1 "two"!="three"; at i=0 k=2 "two"!="four"; at 0 3 "two"!="five"; 1 0 "three"!="two"; 1 1 "three"=="three" so each is removed; 1 2 "four"!="five"; no more cycles. In the second double loop: 0 0 "two"=="two" so each is removed; 0 1 is not run because at this point a1 only has "four" so a1.length==1. Thus we concat "four" in a1 with "four" and "five" in a2. –  Jose_X May 16 '11 at 23:32

This comment quickly explains what your code was doing:

@Crystal, first double loop: at i=0 k=0 "one"=="one" so each is removed; at i=0 k=1 "two"!="three"; at i=0 k=2 "two"!="four"; at 0 3 "two"!="five"; 1 0 "three"!="two"; 1 1 "three"=="three" so each is removed; 1 2 "four"!="five"; no more cycles. In the second double loop: 0 0 "two"=="two" so each is removed; 0 1 is not run because at this point a1 only has "four" so a1.length==1. Thus we concat "four" in a1 with "four" and "five" in a2

To get the answer you want, change

a1.splice(i, 1);

to

a1.splice(i--, 1);

And rinse,repeat for the other 3 similar cases within the double loops. So you will have 4 cases of taking the splice and decrementing by one its first argument. This decrementing makes up for the splice's removal.

However, you now only need one of the double loops since that will remove all overlaps.

Also, why do you have a check at the top to filter out the cases of a1 having length greater than or equal to the length of a2? Remove that section as well.

The answer will be "five". You can test very different data if you want, and it should work.

So this might be your program:

function diff(a1, a2) {

a1 = a1.slice(0);
a2 = a2.slice(0);


for (i = 0; i < a1.length; i++) {
    for (k = 0; k < a2.length; k++) {
        if (a1[i] == a2[k]) {
            a1.splice(i--, 1);
            a2.splice(k--, 1);
        }
    }
}


a1 = a1.concat(a2);
return a1;
}

var s1 = ["one", "two", "seven", "three", "four",];
var s2 = ["one", "two", "four", "five", "six"];


document.write(diff(s1, s2));
share|improve this answer

You loop over the array while splicing it, but you don't adjust for that with your indexes.

share|improve this answer

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