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How can I reduce the number of lines of code of the following without having a default constructor?

#include <vector>

enum Rank { DEUCE, THREE, FOUR, FIVE, SIX, SEVEN, EIGHT, NINE, TEN, JACK, QUEEN, KING, ACE };

enum Suit { HEART, DIAMOND, CLUB, SPADE };

struct Card {
    Card(Rank r, Suit s) : rank(r), suit(s) { }
    Card(const Card& copy) : rank(copy.rank), suit(copy.suit) {}

    Rank rank;
    Suit suit;
};

const Card deckOfCards[52] = {
    Card(ACE, HEART),
    Card(DEUCE, HEART),
    Card(THREE, HEART),
    Card(FOUR, HEART),
    Card(FIVE, HEART),
    Card(SIX, HEART),
    Card(SEVEN, HEART),
    Card(EIGHT, HEART),
    Card(NINE, HEART),
    Card(TEN, HEART),
    Card(JACK, HEART),
    Card(QUEEN, HEART),
    Card(KING, HEART),
    Card(ACE, DIAMOND),
    Card(DEUCE, DIAMOND),
    Card(THREE, DIAMOND),
    Card(FOUR, DIAMOND),
    Card(FIVE, DIAMOND),
    Card(SIX, DIAMOND),
    Card(SEVEN, DIAMOND),
    Card(EIGHT, DIAMOND),
    Card(NINE, DIAMOND),
    Card(TEN, DIAMOND),
    Card(JACK, DIAMOND),
    Card(QUEEN, DIAMOND),
    Card(KING, DIAMOND),
    Card(ACE, CLUB),
    Card(DEUCE, CLUB),
    Card(THREE, CLUB),
    Card(FOUR, CLUB),
    Card(FIVE, CLUB),
    Card(SIX, CLUB),
    Card(SEVEN, CLUB),
    Card(EIGHT, CLUB),
    Card(NINE, CLUB),
    Card(TEN, CLUB),
    Card(JACK, CLUB),
    Card(QUEEN, CLUB),
    Card(KING, CLUB),
    Card(ACE, SPADE),
    Card(DEUCE, SPADE),
    Card(THREE, SPADE),
    Card(FOUR, SPADE),
    Card(FIVE, SPADE),
    Card(SIX, SPADE),
    Card(SEVEN, SPADE),
    Card(EIGHT, SPADE),
    Card(NINE, SPADE),
    Card(TEN, SPADE),
    Card(JACK, SPADE),
    Card(QUEEN, SPADE),
    Card(KING, SPADE)
};

class Deck {
public:
    Deck() : cards(deckOfCards, deckOfCards + 52) {}
    ~Deck() {}

private:
    std::vector<Card> cards;
};
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1  
Note that your copy constructor does the exact same thing as the one that the compiler would provide for you implicitly. If you do write a copy constructor, make sure also to write the copy assignment operator and destructor (whenever you need one of those three functions, you usually need all three). –  James McNellis May 16 '11 at 1:40
    
Reduce the number of lines? In addition to getting rid of the superfluous copy constructor (per James's comment) you can also remove all line breaks in your code, thus ending up with a single line! Or, more precisely, with two lines, since #include requires a separate line. I don't think you can make it less than that. –  AnT May 16 '11 at 1:51
    
@AndreyT: I eyed ya hack, be hackneyed, aye? –  Tony D May 16 '11 at 2:11

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can use a loop and add the elements to the container in the body of the constructor:

Deck() 
{
    for (int rank = (int)DEUCE; rank <= (int)ACE; ++rank) 
    {
        for (int suit = (int)HEART; suit <= (int)SPADE; ++suit)
        {
            cards.push_back(Card((Rank)rank, (Suit)suit));
        }
    }
}

This could be made cleaner and less error-prone if you had sentinels for FIRST_ENUMERATOR and LAST_ENUMERATOR for each enumeration, but even without that this is still better than typing out all the combinations by hand.

share|improve this answer
2  
Good tip to prevent unnecessary memory rellocation will be usage cards.reserve(52); before this cycle. And to leave order of the elements the same you should change enum Rank { DEUCE, THREE, FOUR, FIVE, SIX, SEVEN, EIGHT, NINE, TEN, JACK, QUEEN, KING, ACE }; to enum Rank { ACE, DEUCE, THREE, FOUR, FIVE, SIX, SEVEN, EIGHT, NINE, TEN, JACK, QUEEN, KING }; –  mbykov May 16 '11 at 1:50
    
Hate the C cast. Personally I would define Rank& operator++(Rank&) which will also be useful when testing fro straits. –  Loki Astari May 16 '11 at 8:28

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