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I have incorrect result when converting file to string in Delphi XE. There are several ' characters that makes the result incorrect. I've used UnicodeFileToWideString and FileToString from http://www.delphidabbler.com/codesnip and my code :

 function LoadFile(const FileName: TFileName): ansistring;
  begin
    with TFileStream.Create(FileName, fmOpenRead or fmShareDenyWrite) do
    begin
      try
        SetLength(Result, Size);
        Read(Pointer(Result)^, Size);
        // ReadBuffer(Result[1], Size);
      except
        Result := ''; 
        Free;
      end;
      Free;
    end;
  end;

The result between Delphi XE and Delphi 6 is different. The result from D6 is correct. I've compared with result of a hex editor program.

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1  
I don't understand the question at all but I do know that you must not free an object twice like you are doing. –  David Heffernan May 16 '11 at 6:22
    
Yeah sorry for that. I should use try..finally –  user May 16 '11 at 6:39
1  
I don't understand the question, either. Can you please give an example of the input file, the expected output, and the actual output? Where do you see apostrophes? –  Rob Kennedy May 16 '11 at 6:39
    
could you also show us the code that calls this function –  David Heffernan May 16 '11 at 6:41
2  
I'd also like to point out that AnsiString was never really ideal for storing the contents of a binary file, but as of Delphi 2009, it's a poor choice because of the code-page conversions that Delphi does when assigning strings variables. If you want to hold the contents of a file, use an array of bytes, like TBytes, or just load it into a TMemoryStream. –  Rob Kennedy May 16 '11 at 7:13
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your output is being produced in the style of the Delphi debugger, which displays string variables using Delphi's own string-literal format. Whatever function you're using to produce that output from your own program has actually been fixed for Delphi XE. It's really your Delphi 6 output that's incorrect.

Delphi string literals consist of a series of printable characters between apostrophes and a series of non-printable characters designated by number signs and the numeric values of each character. To represent an apostrophe, write two of them next to each other. The printable and non-printable series of characters can be written right not to each other; there's no need to concatenate them with the + operator.

Here's an excerpt from the output you say is correct:

#$12'O)=ù'dlû'#6't

There are four lone apostrophes in that string, so each one either opens or closes a series of printable characters. We don't necessarily know which is which when we start reading the string at the left because the #, $, 1, and 2 characters are all printable on their own. But if they represent printable characters, then the 0, ), =, and ù characters are in the non-printable region, and that can't be. Therefore, the first apostrophe above opens a printable series, and the #$12 part represents the character at code 18 (12 in hexadecimal). After the ù is another apostrophe. Since the previous one opened a printable string, this one must close it. But the next character after that is d, which is not #, and therefore cannot be the start of a non-printable character code. Therefore, this string from your Delphi 6 code is mal-formed.

The correct version of that excerpt is this:

#$12'O)=ù''dlû'#6't

Now there are three lone apostrophes and one set of doubled apostrophes. The problematic apostrophe from the previous string has been doubled, indicating that it is a literal apostrophe instead of a printable-string-closing one. The printable series continues with dlû. Then it's closed to insert character No. 6, and then opened again for t. The apostrophe that opens the entire string, at the beginning of the file, is implicit.

You haven't indicated what code you're using to produce the output you've shown, but that's where the problem was. It's not there anymore, and the code that loads the file is correct, so the only place that needs your debugging attention is any code that depended on the old, incorrect format. You'd still do well to replace your code with that of Robmil since it does better at handling (or not handling) exceptions and empty files.

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Thanks, your explanation is great. Somehow there's unintended problem with my input file so I was confused about the result. Anyway, I have done what I want to do (convert : binary file => ansistring => hex string, match the hex string with my Delphi 6 pattern). –  user May 17 '11 at 12:12
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Actually, looking at the real data, your problem is that the file stores binary data, not string data, so interpreting this as a string is not valid at all. The only reason it works at all in Delphi 6 is that non-Unicode Delphi allows you to treat binary data and strings the same way. You cannot do this in Unicode Delphi, nor should you.

The solution to get the actual text from within the file is to read the file as binary data, and then copy any values from this binary data, one byte at a time, to a string if it is a "valid" Ansi character (printable).

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I will suggest the code:

function LoadFile(const FileName: TFileName): AnsiString;
begin
  with TFileStream.Create(FileName, fmOpenRead or fmShareDenyWrite) do
  try
    SetLength(Result, Size);
    if Size > 0 then
      Read(Result[1], Size);
  finally
    Free;
  end;
end;
share|improve this answer
    
Why? Although this is undeniably better code than the original, can you please explain why you think this code will actually solve the problem? (Maybe you could explain the problem, too, because I don't understand what it is.) –  Rob Kennedy May 16 '11 at 6:38
1  
The code still produce same invalid result like my code. –  user May 16 '11 at 6:45
    
Why ? Because it works properly regarding exception handling. The problem probably is in reading a non-ANSI text file. So, the Result has a non readable string ? –  robmil May 16 '11 at 6:51
    
Just for clarify that the code doesn't produce same code with my code because your code can't read non-ANSI and there are still apostrophes in result. –  user May 16 '11 at 7:04
1  
Yes, it works correctly for handling exceptions. But what reason do you have to think that exceptions are the problem here? Non-Ansi text files don't cause exceptions. –  Rob Kennedy May 16 '11 at 7:06
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