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Hey everyone, I've been trying to get an ANN I coded to work with the backpropagation algorithm. I have read several papers on them, but I'm noticing a few discrepancies.

Here seems to be the super general format of the algorithm:

  1. Give input
  2. Get output
  3. Calculate error
  4. Calculate change in weights
  5. Repeat steps 3 and 4 until we reach the input level

But here's the problem: The weights need to be updated at some point, obviously. However, because we're back propagating, we need to use the weights of previous layers (ones closer to the output layer, I mean) when calculating the error for layers closer to the input layer. But we already calculated the weight changes for the layers closer to the output layer! So, when we use these weights to calculate the error for layers closer to the input, do we use their old values, or their "updated values"?

In other words, if we were to put the the step of updating the weights in my super general algorithm, would it be:

(Updating the weights immediately)

  1. Give input
  2. Get output
  3. Calculate error
  4. Calculate change in weights
  5. Update these weights
  6. Repeat steps 3,4,5 until we reach the input level

OR

(Using the "old" values of the weights)

  1. Give input
  2. Get output
  3. Calculate error
  4. Calculate change in weights
  5. Store these changes in a matrix, but don't change these weights yet
  6. Repeat steps 3,4,5 until we reach the input level
  7. Update the weights all at once using our stored values

In this paper I read, in both abstract examples (the ones based on figures 3.3 and 3.4), they say to use the old values, not to immediately update the values. However, in their "worked example 3.1", they use the new values (even though what they say they're using are the old values) for calculating the error of the hidden layer.

Also, in my book "Introduction to Machine Learning by Ethem Alpaydin", though there is a lot of abstract stuff I don't yet understand, he says "Note that the change in the first-layer weight delta-w_hj, makes use of the second layer weight v_h. Therefore, we should calculate the changes in both layers and update the first-layer weights, making use of the old value of the second-layer weights, then update the second-layer weights."

To be honest, it really seems like they just made a mistake and all the weights are updated simultaneously at the end, but I want to be sure. My ANN is giving me strange results, and I want to be positive that this isn't the cause.

Anyone know?

Thanks!

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A question on the side: What "strange results" are you getting? Using neural networks needs a lot of experience and it is very easy to get strange results if you do not use them corectely. For a simple and understandable introduction have a look at this manuscript. –  LiKao May 16 '11 at 10:09

4 Answers 4

As far as I know, you should update weights immediately. The purpose of back-propagation is to find weights that minimize the error of the ANN, and it does so by doing a gradient descent. I think the algorithm description in the Wikipedia page is quite good. You may also double-check its implementation in the joone engine.

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You are usually backpropagating deltas not errors. These deltas are calculated from the errors, but they do not mean the same thing. Once you have the deltas for layer n (counting from input to output) you use these deltas and the weigths from the layer n to calculate the deltas for layer n-1 (one closer to input). The deltas only have a meaning for the old state of the network, not for the new state, so you should always use the old weights for propagating the deltas back to the input.

Deltas mean in a sense how much each part of the NN has contributed to the error before, not how much it will contribute to the error in the next step (because you do not know the actual error yet).

As with most machine-learning techniques it will probably still work, if you use the updated, weights, but it might converge slower.

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Hi, thanks for responding! Yeah, this is what I suspected. It really wouldn't make sense to use the updated weights of layer n to calculate stuff for layer n - 1. As for when you say that we are "usually backpropagating deltas, not errors", by 'deltas' do you mean delta of weights (as in, how much the weights have to be changed), or the symbol delta? Because unless I'm mistaken, the symbol delta is generally used to represent the error for a layer. Thanks! –  declan May 16 '11 at 16:15

If you simply train it on a single input-output pair my intuition would be to update weights immediately, because the gradient is not constant. But I don't think your book mentions only a single input-output pair. Usually you come up with an ANN because you have many input-output samples from a function you would like to model with the ANN. Thus your loops should repeat from step 1 instead of from step 3.

If we label your two methods as new->online and old->offline, then we have two algorithms.

  • The online algorithm is good when you don't know how many sample input-output relations you are going to see, and you don't mind some randomness in they way the weights update.

  • The offline algorithm is good if you want to fit a particular set of data optimally. To avoid overfitting the samples in your data set, you can split it into a training set and a test set. You use the training set to update the weights, and the test set to measure how good a fit you have. When the error on the test set begins to increase, you are done.

Which algorithm is best depends on the purpose of using an ANN. Since you talk about training until you "reach input level", I assume you train until output is exactly as the target value in the data set. In this case the offline algorithm is what you need. If you were building a backgammon playing program, the online algorithm would be a better because you have an unlimited data set.

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In this book, the author talks about how the whole point of the backpropagation algorithm is that it allows you to efficiently compute all the weights in one go. In other words, using the "old values" is efficient. Using the new values is more computationally expensive, and so that's why people use the "old values" to update the weights.

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Why was this down-voted? –  Humble Student Oct 16 at 16:36

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