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I have an application that contains Menu and sub menus. I have attached Appliocation Commands to some of the sub menu items such as Cut, Copy and Paste.
I also have some other menu items that do not have application commands.
How could I add a custom command binding to those sub menu items?
I have gone through this article but unable to attach event to my sub menu items.

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Found this youtube link. youtube.com/watch?v=mG4l0AaYBTM –  Sangram Sep 28 '13 at 17:34

3 Answers 3

up vote 63 down vote accepted

I use a static class that I place after the Window1 class (or whatever the window class happens to be named) where I create instances of the RoutedUICommand class:

public static class Command {

    public static readonly RoutedUICommand DoSomething = new RoutedUICommand("Do something", "DoSomething", typeof(Window1));
    public static readonly RoutedUICommand SomeOtherAction = new RoutedUICommand("Some other action", "SomeOtherAction", typeof(Window1));
    public static readonly RoutedUICommand MoreDeeds = new RoutedUICommand("More deeds", "MoreDeeeds", typeof(Window1));

}

Add a namespace in the window markup, using the namespace that the Window1 class is in:

xmlns:w="clr-namespace:NameSpaceOfTheApplication"

Now I can create bindings for the commands just as for the application commands:

<Window.CommandBindings>
    <CommandBinding Command="ApplicationCommands.Open" Executed="CommandBinding_Open" />
    <CommandBinding Command="ApplicationCommands.Paste" Executed="CommandBinding_Paste" />
    <CommandBinding Command="w:Command.DoSomething" Executed="CommandBinding_DoSomething" />
    <CommandBinding Command="w:Command.SomeOtherAction" Executed="CommandBinding_SomeOtherAction" />
    <CommandBinding Command="w:Command.MoreDeeds" Executed="CommandBinding_MoreDeeds" />
</Window.CommandBindings>

And use the bindings in a menu for example:

<MenuItem Name="Menu_DoSomething" Header="Do Something" Command="w:Command.DoSomething" />
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3  
Having the static class to hold the RoutedUICommands was the key for me. (If they were in my Window1 class, the XAML couldn't find them.) Thanks! –  ewall Dec 29 '09 at 22:11
6  
The importance of the class being static really cannot be understated. Frustratingly, WPF seems to silently ignore commands if they are defined in a non-static class. –  Patrick Linskey Nov 19 '10 at 2:39
    
great! thanks ! –  garik Mar 10 '11 at 14:37
11  
Got it running in ten minutes.. I love stackoverflow. –  user180326 Jun 1 '11 at 7:54
1  
Why the downvote? If you don't explain what it is that you think is wrong, it can't improve the answer. –  Guffa Apr 16 '13 at 20:43

Instead of defining them in a static class, you might as well declare the commands directly in XAML. Example (adapted from Guffas nice example):

<Window.Resources>
    <RoutedUICommand x:Key="DoSomethingCommand" Text="Do Something" />
    <RoutedUICommand x:Key="DoSomethingElseCommand" Text="Do Something Else" />
</Window.Resources>
<Window.CommandBindings>
    <CommandBinding Command="{StaticResource DoSomethingCommand}" Executed="CommandBinding_DoSomething" />
    <CommandBinding Command="{StaticResource DoSomethingElseCommand}" Executed="CommandBinding_DoSomethingElse" />
</Window.CommandBindings>
...
<MenuItem Name="Menu_DoSomething" Header="Do Something" Command="{StaticResource DoSomethingCommand}" />
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Does any of this bind to actual C# code? If so, how? What purpose do the RoutedUICommands serve? What functionality do they add? –  Ed Plunkett Apr 16 '13 at 18:43
1  
@EdJ.Plunkett: 1. Yes. 2. Through the CommandBindings: CommandBinding_DoSomething and CommandBinding_DoSomethingElse are C# code. 3./4. For a general discussion about the advantages of RoutedCommands vs. regular Button_Click-bindings, see, for example, joshsmithonwpf.wordpress.com/2008/03/18/… (Section "Who Cares?"). –  Heinzi Apr 17 '13 at 5:20
    
Thanks. I was wondering what the RoutedUICommands add relative to Guffa's example, not relative to regular to old-fashioned onclick handling (if I understand you -- which if I necessarily did, I wouldn't be asking all this!), but I'll look for that in the Josh Smith article. –  Ed Plunkett Apr 17 '13 at 13:13
    
@EdJ.Plunkett: Ah, ok. Guffa also uses RoutedUICommands, he just declares them in a static class instead of in the XAML. That's the only difference between his example and mine. It's a matter of preference of where you want to have them. –  Heinzi Apr 17 '13 at 13:20

I Know that my answer is too late, but i hope it will help for the future.

I Like Guffa and Heinzi answers, but you can use only one command to achieve the previous result. I usually use the Help command

 <Window.CommandBindings>
        <CommandBinding Command="Help" Executed="HelpExecuted" />
  </Window.CommandBindings>

and I use CommandParametr with each call e.g

<Window.InputBindings>
    <KeyBinding Command="Help" Key="A" Modifiers="Ctrl" CommandParameter="Case1"/>
    <KeyBinding Command="Help" Key="B" Modifiers="Ctrl" CommandParameter="Case2"/>
    <KeyBinding Command="Help" Key="C" Modifiers="Ctrl" CommandParameter="Case3"/>
    <KeyBinding Command="Help" Key="D" Modifiers="Ctrl" CommandParameter="Case4"/>
    <MouseBinding Command="Help" MouseAction="LeftDoubleClick" CommandParameter="Case5" />
</Window.InputBindings>

or

<Button Command="Help" CommandParameter="Case6" Content="Button">
    <Button.InputBindings>
        <KeyBinding Command="Help" Gesture="Ctrl+D" CommandParameter="Case7"/>
    </Button.InputBindings>
</Button>

and in the cs file

private void HelpExecuted(object sender, ExecutedRoutedEventArgs e)
{
    string str = e.Parameter as string;
    switch (str)
    {
        case null://F1 Pressed default Help
               //Code
            break;
        case "Case1":
               //Code
            break;
        case "Case2":
               //Code
            break;
        case "Case3":
               //Code
            break;
        case "Case4":
            break;
        case "Case5":
               //Code
            break;
        case "Case6":
               //Code
            break;
        case "Case7":
               //Code
            break;
    }
    e.Handled = true;
}

and if you are using MVVM pattern

private void HelpExecuted(object sender, ExecutedRoutedEventArgs e)
{
    string str = e.Parameter as string;
    Mvvm_Variable.Action(Input: str);
    e.Handled = true;
}

and move the switch to ViewModule site. and Action is a method in the same ViewModule class.

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1  
Just the ticket! Using the Properties value of a Command has opened up so many new possibilities for me :-) I just used ApplicationCommands.NotACommand with Properties for MinimizeWindow, MaximizeWindow and RestoreDownWindow –  Heliac Apr 12 '13 at 14:20

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