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Why the follwoing code is failing ?

typedef vector<SOCKET /*socket*/> UIConnection;

UIConnection::iterator itrUICon;

for ( itrUICon = m_ListUIConnection.begin();itrUICon != m_ListUIConnection.end();itrUICon++)
{
    if (*itrUICon == nSock)
    {           
        itrUICon = m_ListUIConnection.erase(itrUICon);          
    }
}
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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Probably because you are erasing the last item in the vector and then incrementing itrUICon in the increment part of the for statement when it is already equal to .end().

Prefer using the erase()/std::remove() idiom or at least move the increment out of the for statement and only perform it if you didn't preform an erase.

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charles will this work for map as well.typedef map<unsigned long /*mac id */ ,int /*socket*/> GatewayConnection; –  Chris_vr May 16 '11 at 7:01
    
@Chris_vr: For std::remove won't work for associative containers because they preserve order. You can do mp.erase(it++); instead because erasing an element from a map doesn't invalidate any iterators other than those pointing to the element removed. –  Charles Bailey May 16 '11 at 7:31

You must remove the ++itrUICon in the for instruction.

UIConnection::iterator itrUICon;

for ( itrUICon = m_ListUIConnection.begin();itrUICon != m_ListUIConnection.end(); )
{
    if (*itrUICon == nSock)
    {           
        itrUICon = m_ListUIConnection.erase(itrUICon);          
    }
    else ++itrUICon;
}
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Dang, right! I remember that one from my last project actually. –  Xeo May 16 '11 at 6:46
    
Why the downvote? –  Simone May 16 '11 at 6:49
    
@Simone: Probably a random drive-by. I received one at about the same time as yours. –  Charles Bailey May 16 '11 at 6:51
    
@Charles I see. I didn't know that things like that happens on SO too –  Simone May 16 '11 at 6:56
3  
@Martin from your link: "Return value: A random access iterator pointing to the new location of the element that followed the last element erased by the function call, which is the vector end if the operation erased the last element in the sequence.". –  Simone May 16 '11 at 6:58

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