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i want to pass a function to another function as a parameter.

I want to do that because the latter function calls an async Jquery method and AFTER that gives a result back, i want some javascript code executed.

And because this function is called from multiple places, i want the code to execute (after the async Jquery code gets executed) to be passed in the function. Makes sense? i hope :)

Now what is see is that the order in which the code is executed is noth what i want. I've simplified the code to this code:

$('#AddThirdParty').click(function() {
    var func = new function() {
        alert('1');
        alert('2');
        alert('3');
    }
    alert('4');
    LoadHtml(func);
    alert('5');
});
function LoadHtml(funcToExecute) {
    //load some async content
    funcToExecute;
}

Now what i wanted to achieve (or at least what i thought would happen) was that alert4 would fire, then the loadhtml would fire alert1, alert2 and alert3, and then the code would return to alert5.

But what happens is this: alert1, alert2, alert3, alert4, alert5.

Does anyone know what i'm doing wrong and why this is the order in which the code is executed?

It looks like the alert1..alert3 gets executed when i define the new function(), but why doesn't it ALSO get executed when i call it from the LoadHtml function?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 18 down vote accepted
$('#AddThirdParty').click(function() {
    var func = function() { // NOTE: no "new"
        alert('1');
        alert('2');
        alert('3');
    }
    alert('4');
    LoadHtml(func);
    alert('5');
});
function LoadHtml(funcToExecute) {
    //load some async content
    funcToExecute(); // NOTE: parentheses
}

Two errors: the syntax for anonymous functions does not include the keyword new; and JavaScript requires parentheses for function calls, even if functions do not take any arguments. When you just say funcToExecute, that is just a variable giving its value in a context where nothing is using that value (kind of like writing 3; as a statement).

You might notice that you already know how to use anonymous functions: you did not write $('#AddThirdParty').click(new function() ...);

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+1 for the notice of me already using the anonymous function and not knowing it! –  Michel May 16 '11 at 7:52
    
and it's working! –  Michel May 16 '11 at 8:10
    
This is great, but what if he wanted to have parameters inside func? –  EHorodyski Aug 23 '13 at 17:35
    
@DrFeelgood: Then he could have called funcToExecute with those parameters. func becomes funcToExecute inside LoadHtml, so they accept the same parameters. –  Amadan Aug 24 '13 at 15:35
    
So LoadHtml would have to be aware of the parameters that come through? To put this in a better perspective, I'm trying to write a simple jQuery extension method that does a method toggle. I'm having issues doing something like $("#id").fnToggle('click', fnOn($(this)), fnOff($(this)));. My method runs something that toggles the data-toggle element attribute then tries to call fnOn and fnOff without needing to be aware of what parameters are passed into it. –  EHorodyski Aug 24 '13 at 19:49
$('#AddThirdParty').click(function() {
    var func = new function() {
        alert('1');
        alert('2');
        alert('3');
    }
    alert('4');
    LoadHtml(func);
    alert('5');
});
function LoadHtml(funcToExecute) {
    //load some async content
    funcToExecute;
}

The new keyword creates an object from the function. This means the function (which is anonymous) gets called immediatly. This would be the same as

var foo = function() {
    alert("1");
    alert("2");
    alert("3");
}
var func = new foo();

This means your creating a new object (not a function!) and inside the constructor your alert 1,2,3. Then you alert 4. Then you call LoadHtml which does nothing, then you alert 5.

As for

funcToExecute;

The funcToExecute is just a variable containing a function. It actually needs to be executed.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks very much for the answer, 99% the same as Amadan but that one was a little easier (1%) to understand. Hope you don't mind. –  Michel May 16 '11 at 7:54
    
+1 for an easy-to-understand and well-written answer. –  Richard Harris Aug 12 '14 at 5:36

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