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I have been digging into the question for a while in StackOverflow Android get Current UTC time and How can I get the current date and time in UTC or GMT in Java?

I have tried two ways to get the current time of my phone in GMT. I am in Spain and the difference is GMT+2. So let's see with an example: 1º attemp: I created a format and applied it to System.currentTimeMillis();

    DateFormat dfgmt = new java.text.SimpleDateFormat("yyyy-MM-dd hh:mm:ss");   
    dfgmt.setTimeZone(TimeZone.getTimeZone("GMT")); 
    String gmtTime = dfgmt.format(new Date());
    //Using System.currentTimeMillis() is the same as new Date()
    Date dPhoneTime = dfgmt.parse(gmtTime);
    Long phoneTimeUTC = dPhoneTime.getTime();

I need to substract that time to another time, that's why i do the cast to Long.

    DateFormat df = new java.text.SimpleDateFormat("yyyy-MM-dd hh:mm:ss");          
    Date arrivalDate = df.parse(item.getArrivalDate());
    //the String comes from JSON and is for example:"UTC_arrival":"2011-05-16 18:00:00"
    //which already is in UTC format. So the DateFormat doesnt have the GMT paramater as dfgmt
    diff = arrival.getTime() - phoneTimeUTC ;

I also tried this:

    Calendar aGMTCalendar = Calendar.getInstance(TimeZone.getTimeZone("GMT"));
    Long phoneTimeUTC = aGMTCalendar.getTimeInMillis()

And still I dont get the right difference. But if I do this:

    Long phoneTimeUTC = aGMTCalendar.getTimeInMillis()-3600000*2;

It does work OK.

Any ideas?

Thanks a lot,

David.

share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted

As far as I read the calendar.getTimeInMillis(); returns the UTC time in millis. I used the following code and compared it to the Epoch in this site http://www.xav.com/time.cgi.

public int GetUnixTime()
{
    Calendar calendar = Calendar.getInstance();
    long now = calendar.getTimeInMillis();
    int utc = (int)(now / 1000);
    return (utc);

}

Giora

share|improve this answer
2  
-1: getInstance() clearly states: "Constructs a new instance of the Calendar subclass appropriate for the default Locale and default TimeZone.". Probably Calendar.getInstance(TimeZone.getTimeZone("UTC")).getTimeInMillis() will work better – for3st May 8 '15 at 10:01

This works for sure!

        SimpleDateFormat dateFormatGmt = new SimpleDateFormat("dd:MM:yyyy HH:mm:ss");
        dateFormatGmt.setTimeZone(TimeZone.getTimeZone("GMT"));
        System.out.println(dateFormatGmt.format(new Date())+"");

Specify the format, and you will get it in GMT!

share|improve this answer
     Calendar cal = Calendar.getInstance(TimeZone.getTimeZone("GMT"));
     Date currentLocalTime = cal.getTime();
     DateFormat date = new SimpleDateFormat("dd-MM-yyy HH:mm:ss z");   
     date.setTimeZone(TimeZone.getTimeZone("GMT")); 
     String localTime = date.format(currentLocalTime); 
     System.out.println(localTime);

Have a look and see if that works.

share|improve this answer
    
Should I get currentLocaltime using String localTime = date.format(new Date()); right?? – Dayerman May 16 '11 at 10:07
    
I have used this 'code' DateFormat dfgmt = new java.text.SimpleDateFormat("dd-MM-yyyy HH:mm:ss Z"); dfgmt.setTimeZone(TimeZone.getTimeZone("GMT")); String gmtTime = dfgmt.format(new Date().getTime()); Date dPhoneTime = dfgmt.parse(gmtTime); Long phoneTime = dPhoneTime.getTime(); 'code' and still no luck – Dayerman May 16 '11 at 10:13
    
Calendar cal = Calendar.getInstance(TimeZone.getTimeZone("GMT")); cal.add(Calendar.SECOND, 0); Date currentLocalTime = cal.getTime(); DateFormat date = new SimpleDateFormat("dd-MM-yyy HH:mm:ss z"); date.setTimeZone(TimeZone.getTimeZone("GMT")); String localTime = date.format(currentLocalTime); System.out.println(localTime); I just ran this and it seems to work fine for me, i am in the UK so i changed it to EST to test and it seems ok – Vade May 16 '11 at 10:17
    
Hello Vade, I am not looking for the localTime but for the UTC time.If at Spain is now 12.25, I want to get 10.25. with your code I am still getting the localtime. – Dayerman May 16 '11 at 10:25
    
@ Dayerman, sorry i am little confused by what you mean, the code above (edited reply) returns on my computer the current GMT or UTC -0 time. I have tried several times to adjust my computers time zone to utc+3 or utc-2 each time i run the code it still returns the correct GMT time. for example currently in the uk (daylight saving) is 11:30 so utc = 10:30 if i change time to utc+3 it becomes 14:30 but still running that code returns 10:30 – Vade May 16 '11 at 10:31

you can always use:

Calendar mCalendar = Calendar.getInstance(TimeZone.getTimeZone("gmt"));
long millies = mCalendar.getTimeInMillis();

or

Calendar mCalendar = Calendar.getInstance(TimeZone.getTimeZone("utc"));
long millies = mCalendar.getTimeInMillis();
share|improve this answer

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