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here's the code:

#include <string>

class Config {
public:
    static const std::string asdf = "hello world!";
}

I can't diagnose why this won't work

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Thanks for all the extremely quick responses. –  cesar May 16 '11 at 9:06

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Only integral types can be initialized in the class (presuming they're declared as static const).

So do this:

//Config.h
class Config 
{
public:
    static const std::string asdf; //declaration
    static const int demo_integral = 100; //initialization is allowed!
}

//Config.cpp 
const std::string Config::asdf = "hello world!"; //definition & initialization 
const int Config::demo_integral; //already initialized in the class!

Definitions should be in .cpp file, or else you will get multiple definition error if you define them in the header file itself and then you include the header file in multiple files!

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Just as a side question, I use eclipse and it already adds a #IFNDEF preprocessor directive, so is it acceptable that I place the header file? –  cesar May 16 '11 at 8:59
    
@anonymous: In that case, yes. :-) –  Nawaz May 16 '11 at 9:01
    
oh, one last question. I just realized it seems inappropriate for me to use a class as the entire point of config.h is a configuration header with a bunch of constants. Is it more appropriate for me to use #define or should I make a struct? sorry, I'm pretty new to C++ coming from Java. –  cesar May 16 '11 at 9:09
    
@anonymous: Depends. Configuration could mean many thing here. Is it some sort of input to the initialization phase of your program or some component, which you want to be configurable even after deployment, as in the production? If that is the case, then you should use some xml configuration so that in the production it can be changed according to the needs. Or if you want your program configurable before compilation/build, then in that case you can use constant also. But #define is not good idea in C++. You've better alternative. Use enum or const datatypes! –  Nawaz May 16 '11 at 9:19
1  
@anonynous Nawaz covers everything you need to you in his answer. Notice the comments that indicate which part goes in which file. I suspect your professor was more interested in good design rather than just correctness. –  Luc Danton May 16 '11 at 14:49

You cannot do this.

As it is static, it must be defined outside the class ( const std::string asdf inside your class is only declaration, because of the static)

In your case:

const std::string Config::asdf = "hello world!"

You should initialize all data members inside constructor, not like this:

class A
{
    var_t var = value;
};
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Apart from integral types, static const members cannot be initialized within the class definition scope. You have to split it, as follows.

In header file:

#include <string>

class Config {
public:
    static const std::string asdf;
};

And in .cpp file

const std::string Config::asdf = "hello world!";
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You have to declare it outside of the class:

#include <string>

class Config {
public:
    static const std::string asdf = "hello world!";
}

const std::string Config::asdf = "hello world";

Also look here.

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From:

http://cplusplus.syntaxerrors.info/index.php?title=Invalid_in-class_initialization_of_static_data_member_of_non-integral_type_%E2%80%98const_char*%E2%80%99

You are only allowed to first assign variables that are enumeration types or"integral" types -- int, char, long, etc -- inside a class definition. Char* is not an integral type, so you can only assign to it in global scope.

It is possible for you to do this as a workaround:

#include <string>

class Config {
public:
    static const std::string asdf()
    {
       return "Hello World!";
    }
};
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