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For example:

var $myContainer = $('#myContainer');
$myContainer.html(someHtml);
var width = $myContainer.height();
var height = $myContainer.height();

If #myContainer was an empty div, width and height would still be zero. A solution is to use a timeout:

var $myContainer = $('#myContainer');
$myContainer.html(someHtml);
setTimeout(function () {
    var width = $myContainer.height();
    var height = $myContainer.height();
}, 500);

However, I don't like the magic number in there. What if its a really slow browser? Is there any reliable cross browser method available to tell me when the browser has rendered the changes?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can use 0 for the timeout, reliably. It won't actually be 0ms, you understand, most browsers will make it at least 5 or 10, but just the act of yielding to the browser is sufficient.

That said, I'm not immediately finding a browser that doesn't get the (new) height right immediately, without a yield (even IE6!). But I wouldn't be surprised if, depending on markup and such, there were one...

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Today I went back and tested the timeout code with a zero, and it worked. I put this down to this week having a new work computer, which is much faster. With my old machine I needed a timeout of at least 100ms. Do you have a fast machine? –  Sprintstar May 16 '11 at 11:21
    
@Sprintstar: Yes, but I don't think it a difference for functions like height. Ajax (referenced in other comments) would be a totally different matter, the only reliable way to handle that is the callback. I've used the setTimeout trick with 0 on single-core Atom netbooks. The above updates immediately (without even waiting for the timeout) on Safari on my phone, which is probably my slowest machine (not that it's slow). The first step would be to find a browser were the height didn't immediately update (I haven't yet), and then to see if anything above 0 were required. –  T.J. Crowder May 16 '11 at 11:56

Feels like a hack but might work: Add a script element to the DOM as the last element. All browsers should execute that after all the other elements have "settled."

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Are you using ajax?

So you can use jQuery 'load'.

var $myContainer = $('#myContainer');
$myContainer.load('/url/for/someHtml', function(){
  var width = $myContainer.height();
  var height = $myContainer.height();
});
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I am using ajax, but wasn't using load (I am now where possible). However I am now unable to test this (see my other comment). It uses the same innerHTML method as .html(), so I am not sure this is going to be any different. –  Sprintstar May 16 '11 at 11:26
    
If you're using ajax I see no reason to didn't use .load(), that gives you an immediate callback after load the content. If I uderstand your intention. –  Edison Machado May 19 '11 at 9:26

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