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I have a class like this:

public class Product : IProduct
{
    static private string _defaultName = "default";
    private string _name;
    private float _price;
    /// Constructor
    public Product()
    {
        _price = 10.0F;
    }
    public void ModifyPrice(float modifier)
    {
        _price = _price * modifier;
    }  

I want ModifyPrice to do nothing for a specific value, but I also want to call the constructor that set the price to 10. I tried something like this:

var fake = new SProduct() { CallBase = true };
var mole = new MProduct(fake)
    {
        ModifyPriceSingle = (actual) =>
        {
            if (actual != 20.0f)
            {
                MolesContext.ExecuteWithoutMoles(() => fake.ModifyPrice(actual));
            }
        }
    };
MProduct.Constructor = (@this) => (@this) = fake;

But even if fake is well-initialized with the good constructor, I can't assign it to @this. I also try something like

MProduct.Constructor = (@this) => { var mole = new MProduct(@this)... };

But this time I cannot call my constructor. How am I supposed to do?

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2 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You don't need to mock the constructor, the parameterless constructor of the Product class already does what you want.

Add some debugging output to Product.

public class Product
{
    private float _price;
    public Product()
    {
        _price = 10.0F;
        Debug.WriteLine("Initializing price: {0}", _price);
    }
    public void ModifyPrice(float modifier)
    {
        _price = _price*modifier;
        Debug.WriteLine("New price: {0}", _price);
    }
}

Mock only the ModifyPrice method.

[TestMethod]
[HostType("Moles")]
public void Test1()
{
    // Call a constructor that sets the price to 10.
    var fake = new SProduct { CallBase = true };
    var mole = new MProduct(fake)
    {
        ModifyPriceSingle = actual =>
        {
            if (actual != 20.0f)
            {
                MolesContext.ExecuteWithoutMoles(() => fake.ModifyPrice(actual));
            }
            else
            {
                Debug.WriteLine("Skipped setting price.");
            }
        }
    };
    fake.ModifyPrice(20f);
    fake.ModifyPrice(21f);
}

See the debug output to confirm everything works as expected:

    Initializing price: 10
    Skipped setting price.
    New price: 210

By the way, you don't need to use the stub here,

var fake = new SProduct { CallBase = true };

creating an instance of Product will suffice.

var fake = new Product();

Update: Mocking a single method can be achieved with the AllInstances class like this

MProduct.Behavior = MoleBehaviors.Fallthrough;
MProduct.AllInstances.ModifyPriceSingle = (p, actual) =>
{
    if (actual != 20.0f)
    {
        MolesContext.ExecuteWithoutMoles(() => p.ModifyPrice(actual));
    }
    else
    {
        Debug.WriteLine("Skipped setting price.");
    }
};

// Call the constructor that sets the price to 10.
Product p1 = new Product();
// Skip setting the price.
p1.ModifyPrice(20f);
// Set the price.
p1.ModifyPrice(21f);
share|improve this answer
    
Hum, you didn't understand my question. Your example have good points. However, I need a mock of Product which calls original methods, except for ModifyPrice. That why I need a CallBase = true (for a Stub) or an InstanceBehavior = MoleBehaviors.FallThrough (for a Mole). Moreover, and that's the most important point, I want to swamp all future instance of Product with my mock! That's why I need to mock the constructor. –  Jeco Jun 8 '11 at 7:14
1  
@Jeco I may have misunderstood you again, but it looks like you could achieve what you want with the AllInstances class. –  Gebb Jun 9 '11 at 16:45
    
Still a good answer. I apologize for my incomplete examples, I always have other points in mind. I was comparing several mocking framework to Moles so I tried to study all possibilities. Swamp all future instance of an object with a Moles seems to be a good idea (I tried to check all methods calls and it represented to much 'AllInstances' compared to an 'NonImplementedException'). I was trying desperately to use the constructor to do '@this=aMole'... But as said in Moles manual, it's really an isolation framework and not a mock framework. Thanks for the answers –  Jeco Jun 10 '11 at 13:39
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MProduct.Behavior = MoleBehaviors.Fallthrough;
share|improve this answer
    
Very terse answer... –  Anders R. Bystrup Nov 15 '12 at 10:58
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