Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I'm stuck at trying to write the Entity Framework 4.1 code first model for the following DB relationship.

Here is a visual of the relationship.enter image description here

dbo.[Companies] can have either Seller or Debtor as Company Types.

dbo.[SellerDebtors] defines the connection a Seller Company has with a Debtor Company.

The code i've written is based on my original EF 4.0 POCO model code. This is what I've come up with - This code does not work.

public class SellerDebtor
{
    public int SellerDebtorId { get; set; }
    public int DebtorCompanyId { get; set; }
    public int SellerCompanyId { get; set; }

    public Company DebtorCompany { get; set; }
    public Company SellerCompany { get; set; }

    public ICollection<SellerDebtorInfo> SellerDebtorInfos { get; set; }
    public ICollection<SellerDebtorFile> SellerDebtorFiles { get; set; }    
}


public class Company
{
    public int CompanyId { get; set; }
    public string CompanyType { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }

    public virtual ICollection<User> Users { get; set; }
    public virtual ICollection<CompanyInfo> CompanyInfos { get; set; }
    public virtual ICollection<CompanyFile> CompanyFiles { get; set; }

    public virtual ICollection<SellerDebtor> SellerDebtorDebtorCompanies { get; set; }
    public virtual ICollection<SellerDebtor> SellerDebtorSellerCompanies { get; set; }

}

At the moment, I'm getting this as an error:

System.Data.SqlClient.SqlException: Invalid column name 'DebtorCompany_CompanyId'.
Invalid column name 'SellerCompany_CompanyId'.
Invalid column name 'Company_CompanyId'.
Invalid column name 'Company_CompanyId1'.

Ideally, I'd like to be able to maintain the naming of the relationships.

I'm guessing i need to set some attributes but i'm not sure what to set.

share|improve this question
up vote 17 down vote accepted

EF is not able to determine by convention which navigation properties on your 2 classes belong together and creates 4 relationships (without an end on the other side) instead of 2 (with ends on both sides). This problem occurs always when you have more than one navigation property of the same type (Company in your case) in the same class. You could try to fix this the following way:

public class SellerDebtor
{
    public int SellerDebtorId { get; set; }
    [ForeignKey("DebtorCompany")]
    public int DebtorCompanyId { get; set; }
    [ForeignKey("SellerCompany")]
    public int SellerCompanyId { get; set; }

    [InverseProperty("SellerDebtorDebtorCompanies")]
    public Company DebtorCompany { get; set; }
    [InverseProperty("SellerDebtorSellerCompanies")]
    public Company SellerCompany { get; set; }

    public ICollection<SellerDebtorInfo> SellerDebtorInfos { get; set; }
    public ICollection<SellerDebtorFile> SellerDebtorFiles { get; set; }    
}

[InverseProperty(...)] defines the navigation property on the other end of the relationship and it tells EF explicitely which pairs of navigation properties belong together in a relationship.

share|improve this answer

This blog has the example using Fluent API configurations.

Multiple foreign keys within same table using CodeFirst Entity Framework and Fluent API

share|improve this answer
    
Really glad you posted this. I needed this Fluent API example today. – Brandon Jun 13 '13 at 20:20
    
IMHO the best answer. The fluent API is as clear as a sunny day. – alex440 Oct 2 '14 at 9:11

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.