Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a .ps1 file in which I want to define custom functions.

Imagine the file is called MyFunctions.ps1 and the content is as follows:

Write-Host "Installing functions"
function A1
{
    Write-Host "A1 is running!"
}
Write-Host "Done"

To run this script and theoretically register the A1 function, I navigate to the folder in which the ps1 resides and run the file:

.\MyFunctions.ps1

This outputs:

Installing functions 
Done

Yet when I try to call A1 I simply get the error stating that there is no command/function by that name:

The term 'A1' is not recognized as the name of a cmdlet, function, script file, or operable program. Check the spelling
 of the name, or if a path was included, verify that the path is correct and try again.
At line:1 char:3
+ A1 <<<<
    + CategoryInfo          : ObjectNotFound: (A1:String) [], CommandNotFoundException
    + FullyQualifiedErrorId : CommandNotFoundException

I must misunderstand some powershell concepts. Can I not define functions in script files?

Note that I have already set my execution policy to 'RemoteSigned'. And I know to run .ps1 files using a dot in front of the file name: .\myFile.ps1

share|improve this question
add comment

3 Answers 3

up vote 57 down vote accepted

Try this in powershell command line:

. .\MyFunctions.ps1
A1

Dot operator is used for script include.

share|improve this answer
    
I did not notice that extra little dot that I had to type. Thanks! What does the first "." mean? Does it mean "install"? –  willem May 16 '11 at 11:37
    
It means "include". –  rsc May 16 '11 at 12:13
5  
Well, it means "run this in the current context instead of a child context." –  JasonMArcher May 17 '11 at 16:47
3  
It means source the contents of this file. Same as in bash. ss64.com/bash/period.html –  inquam Mar 2 '12 at 14:59
1  
It doesn't seem to work very well though (at least from ISE) unless you run .\MyFunctions.ps1 first to make it available. I'm not sure about running strictly from powershell.exe. –  Mike Cheel Jul 11 '13 at 15:28
add comment

What you are talking about is called Dot Sourcing. And it's evil. But no worries, there is a better, and easier way to do what you are wanting with Modules (it sounds way scarier than it is). The major benefit of using modules is that you can unload them from the shell if you need to, and it keeps the variables in the functions from creeping into the shell (once you dot source a function file, try calling one of the variables from a function in the shell, and you'll see what I mean).

So first, rename the .ps1 file that has all your functions in it to MyFunctions.psm1 (you've just created a Module!).Now for a Module to load properly, you have to do some specific things with the file. First for Import-Module to see the module (you use this cmdlet to load the module into the shell), it has to be in a specific location. The default path to the Modules folder is $home\Documents\WindowsPowerShell\Modules.

In that folder, create a folder named MyFunctions, and place the MyFunctions.psm1 file into it (the module file must reside in a folder with exactly the same name as the PSM1 file).

Once that is done open powershell, and run this command:

Get-Module -listavailable

If you see one called MyFunctions, you did it right, and your module is ready to be loaded (this is just to ensure that this is set up right, you only have to do this once).

To use the module, type the following in the shell (or put this line in your $profile , or put this as the first line in a script):

Import-Module MyFunctions

You can now run your functions. The cool thing about this is that once you have 10-15 functions in there, you're gonna forget the name of a couple. If you have them in a module, you can run this command:

Get-Command -module MyFunctions

To get a list of all the functions in your module. It's pretty sweet, and the tiny bit of effort that it takes to set up on the front side is WAY worth it.

share|improve this answer
1  
What about if your functions are pertinent only to that given PowerShell application? I mean, if you install a package of PS1's to do a job somewhere, you might not want every function in your profile, right? –  Ian Patrick Hughes Nov 7 '11 at 18:03
1  
In that case, I'd create a module for that specific application, and either load it before running the scripts (if working interactively), or load it within the script. But generally speaking if you have code that is specific only to a given task, you'd want those functions in the script. Personally I only write functions which generically do one thing. If a piece of code is hyper specialized it doesn't really make sense to wrap it in a function or module (unless there are several scripts that use that same code, then it might make sense). –  JoeG Nov 28 '11 at 17:27
add comment

You certainly can define functions in script files (I then tend to load them through my Powershell profile on load).

First you need to check to make sure the function is loaded by running:

ls function:\ | where { $_.Name -eq "A1"  }

And check that it appears in the list (should be a list of 1!), then let us know what output you get!

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 What does the backslash do in the "function:\"? Thanks. –  Sabuncu May 31 '13 at 18:53
1  
In PowerShell function is treated as a directory so it's the same as saying c:\ or d:\. Equally you it will work without the backslash so ls function: | where { $_.Name -eq "A1" } –  Jonny Jun 1 '13 at 11:38
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.