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I'm trying to access a web service located on my server at https://test.mydomain.com. I'm using low level SOAP XML to do this.

Unfortunately, the domain only has a self-signed certificate, showing the error "Please accept this security certificate" to proceed when I go to the webpage. I'm getting that same error message when I send the SOAP request.

I've tried to research some SOAP header information regarding security, but all I can find is how to attach an X509 certificate. What I'd like to do, would be to completely ignore/bypass it.

Again, I'm doing this in XML so I'm looking for something along these lines:

<soap:header>
  <soap:certificate ignoreInvalid="true" />
</soap:header>

Any help would be appreciated and thanks for your time!

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2 Answers 2

Again, I'm doing this in XML so I'm looking for something along these lines:

your source code seems to be missing, use "Code Sample" button, if poste some code.

What I'd like to do, would be to completely ignore/bypass it.

you can not ignore server certificate in SSL, you have to add it to trust list.

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This has nothing to do with the SOAP message itself. It is happening at the SSL/TLS transport layer.

Therefore, it is not solved by putting anything in the SOAP message. The SOAP message is the same, regardless of whether it is using a self-signed certificate, a trusted certificate, or no such security at all.

It can be solved by adding the self-signed certificate to the client's set of trusted root certificates. Where that set lives depends on how your client is written. If it is Windows/.NET it will be the Windows trust store. If it is Java it will be some keystore file. The FireFox browser maintains its own trust store.

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