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Best way to code writing to a specific point in a file using r+ mode and the .insert method?

gets.chomp is used and attached to a variable called x it is this variable and the assigned string that needs to be inserted at a specific position when writing to a file.

Thanks

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What programming language ??? Please tag sensibly. –  Paul R May 16 '11 at 12:52
    
Sorry Paul R, Ruby –  Alex May 16 '11 at 12:57
    
Which #insert method? AFAIK, you can't insert anything directly to an opened file (you can just overwrite), you have to write to another file. –  Mladen Jablanović May 16 '11 at 13:34
    
Ruby this string method "abcde".insert(2, "X") which means the opened file must be put into a string surely for this method to work and then the string must be written to the file? –  Alex May 16 '11 at 17:41
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1 Answer

You can replace or insert stuff in a file. Scroll to 'Modifying a File in Place Without a Temporary File' on Pleac . It's fragile and not considered good practise. The usual way is:

  • read the original file
  • Modify the content in memory
  • Write it to a temporary file
  • (Optionally) rename the original file to something like orig_file.old
  • Rename the temporary file to the originale filename.

This way minimalizes the chance of data loss in case of powerouts and the like.

Update: according to your comment you need something like

File.open('test.txt', 'r+') do |f|
  str = f.read
  f.rewind
  f.write( str.insert(6, ' HI THERE '))
end
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Of course this goes with the usual warnings about not trying to read a file that is larger than the available memory, and checking to see that there is sufficient room on the disk to write the new file back out.... –  the Tin Man May 16 '11 at 23:45
    
It's also possible to copy the first part of the old file, write the new chunk to that copy, then continue copying the old file. That avoids having to pull it all into RAM. –  the Tin Man May 16 '11 at 23:46
    
Thanks steenslag for leading me to Pleac but the Ruby string method .insert is the one I want to use (if that is possible). As it is a string method surely opening a file using r+ mode, put the entire file (not large file) into a string use the .insert method on that string and then write that string to the file. Is that possible? –  Alex May 17 '11 at 10:19
    
@Alex example code added –  steenslag May 17 '11 at 11:06
    
That code works perfectly thank's a lot steenslag –  Alex May 17 '11 at 18:02
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