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I've styled a domain search form with CSS and DIV tags, but it's not W3C compliant since I separated the form tags. How can I get around this and still be able to style each component of the form?

<div class="reg-domain-txt">
<span>Register Your Domain Name Today!</span>
</div>


<div class="checkerform">
<form action="https://www.xhostcompanyx.com/clients/domainchecker.php" method="post">
<input type="hidden" name="token" value="xxxxxxxxx" /> 
<input type="hidden" name="direct" value="true" /> 
<input class="inputbox" type="text" name="domain" size="29" />
</div>

<div class="tldboxlist">
<select class="tldbox" name="ext">
<option>.com</option>
<option>.net</option>
<option>.org</option>
<option>.biz</option>
<option>.us</option>
<option>.info</option>
<option>.mobi</option>
<option>.me</option>
<option>.co</option>
<option>.tv</option>
<option>.pro</option>
</select>
</div>


<div class="domaincheckbutton">
<input class="domainbutton" type="submit" value="Search" />
</form>
</div>
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3  
What do you mean by "separated the form tags"? What errors are you getting? –  Pekka 웃 May 16 '11 at 13:11
    
Could you please post the results from W3C Validator? Or post any errors etc you may be getting? –  βӔḺṪẶⱫŌŔ May 16 '11 at 13:15

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Just put the start and end form tags outside of the divs.

Please explain why this will prevent you from styling?

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He probably forgot to reset the CSS. Some browsers add a big margin-bottom for the <form> tag and so forth. –  Denis May 16 '11 at 13:27
    
Wow, I didn't think to move the form tags outside of the divs. Thank you James! –  Mark May 16 '11 at 14:15
    
@Denis: what has that got to do with validation? –  Paul D. Waite May 16 '11 at 15:43
    
@Paul: if memory serves, validators issue a warning if <form> is not within a <div>. –  Denis May 16 '11 at 15:44
    
@Denis: Oh sure, I just didn’t understand what your comment about a CSS reset had to do with the validation issue. –  Paul D. Waite May 16 '11 at 16:40

The code you’ve posted isn’t valid because you’ve opened a <div> tag, then opened a <form> tag, then closed the <div> tag before closing the <form> tag. You can’t do that with any tags in HTML.

Here’s your HTML, corrected and indented — indentation really helps make these kinds of HTML errors more obvious:

<div class="reg-domain-txt">
    <span>Register Your Domain Name Today!</span>
</div>


<div class="checkerform">
    <form action="https://www.xhostcompanyx.com/clients/domainchecker.php" method="post">
        <input type="hidden" name="token" value="xxxxxxxxx" /> 
        <input type="hidden" name="direct" value="true" /> 
        <input class="inputbox" type="text" name="domain" size="29" />

        <div class="tldboxlist">
            <select class="tldbox" name="ext">
                <option>.com</option>
                <option>.net</option>
                <option>.org</option>
                <option>.biz</option>
                <option>.us</option>
                <option>.info</option>
                <option>.mobi</option>
                <option>.me</option>
                <option>.co</option>
                <option>.tv</option>
                <option>.pro</option>
            </select>
        </div>


        <div class="domaincheckbutton">
            <input class="domainbutton" type="submit" value="Search" />
        </div>
    </form>
</div>
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How can you say so since there's no DOCTYPE ? :-P –  Teneff May 16 '11 at 13:16
2  
@Teneff: the validator guesses at the doctype of code which doesn’t have one; my brain has a similar algorithm built-in :) –  Paul D. Waite May 16 '11 at 13:21
1  
The rule "An element cannot exist only partially inside another element" is universal to all markup languages that you can generate a W3C DOM from. –  Quentin May 16 '11 at 13:25

I would remove the three DIVs. They are not necessary for content or styling. If you need to group together form elements, you should use the FIELDSET tag. Also, if you need to position the entire form, you can give the form an ID or a Class.

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I don’t know if a <fieldset> is really appropriate here though: the form seems to have two sections, each with one field in it. Is one field a <fieldset>? Should we wait until it’s 3am and we’re drunk in a field to contemplate that question? Quite possibly. –  Paul D. Waite May 16 '11 at 13:27

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