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Is there a difference between:

function someMethod( $someArg ) {
  // some code
  return;
}

and

function someMethod( $someArg ) {
  // some code
  // no return
}

Both have NULL as 'return value'. Is there a difference? Something PHP internally? Performance? Speed?

edit
I ask, because in Zend framework (in this video) they use return; which seemed (seems) silly to me. However, you would think that the people behind Zend framework do know their PHP...

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1  
To return or not to return, that's the question. –  Marcel Korpel May 16 '11 at 14:17

9 Answers 9

up vote 17 down vote accepted

php code

<?php

function a() {
   echo 1;
   return;
}

function b() {
   echo 2;
}

generated bytecode

.FUNCTION a
        ECHO                     1
        RETURN                   NULL
        RETURN                   NULL
        HANDLE_EXCEPTION         
.END FUNCTION

.FUNCTION b
        ECHO                     2
        RETURN                   NULL
        HANDLE_EXCEPTION         
.END FUNCTION

so the explicit return statement generates one extra RETURN instruction. Otherwise there's no difference.

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This is exactly what I meant. I'd say from this using return; is not better for performance, because it adds extra commands. If no return; is specified, there's a return specified internally anyway. Did I read that correctly? –  Rudie May 16 '11 at 14:08
1  
@Rudie: no, it is not worse, because only the first RETURN NULL is executed. But even if it was, you wouldn't notice the difference. Don't optimize prematurely. –  Marcel Korpel May 16 '11 at 14:19
1  
@Marcel That's why I didn't say it's worse, but "is not better for performance". I'm not looking to optimize, just curious. I hear that's good. –  Rudie May 16 '11 at 14:32
    
@Marcel - @stereofrog is correct the performance difference is so negligable as to be considered zero because the second return will not even be executed –  Matt Wilko May 16 '11 at 15:19
8  
What do you use to generate this bytecode? –  Yahel May 21 '11 at 13:45

As far as I know there is no difference.

The empty return; is mainly there to break out from a if/else, while or for loop without returning anything.

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Functionally there's no difference but it's always nice to have an obvious point of exit in a function (the return). Some schools of computer science hold tht all functions and methods should have precisely 1, and only 1, point of exit.

Should you need to add a return value in the future then there's an obvious point already picked out for you in the code if you include an empty return.

But like I said, from a functional point of view there's not much difference.

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In your example, no difference.

However, return will terminate the function, so you have the option to skip code after the return statement (that's its purpose).

In your example, it is personal preference if you like to see the return or not.

Further, in some languages like Perl, the last expression is "implicitly" the return value, so you don't even need to use "return". (This won't work in other languages like C++, though.)

sub foo {
  return 12;
}

sub foo2 {
  12;  # same thing
}
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I could be wrong as I'm foggy with perl syntax but foo and foo2 will not return the same value. foo returns a value of 12 where foo2 does not return anything –  Phill Pafford May 16 '11 at 14:03
    
In Perl, the return value is that of the "last evaluated expression", so both would return the same thing. (Weird, but that's Perl. ;-)) devshed.com/c/a/Perl/Returns-and-Perl-Subroutines/2 –  charley May 16 '11 at 19:30
    
+1 for learning something new, Thanks –  Phill Pafford May 16 '11 at 19:58

There isn't a major difference, you can just use return; to break out of a function call early. They will both return NULL either way, it's strictly for workflow.

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In language such as PHP and Python there's no real difference. return; can be used to break out of the function prematurely.

However, there is a difference when the programming language of choice is C/C++, Java, C#, where no return signifies a void

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But return; signifies a void too, doesn't it? –  Rup May 16 '11 at 14:13
    
null, undefined or None. I might be wrong but I think there's a difference in C/C++ –  Pwnna May 16 '11 at 18:27
    
Right, sorry, I meant in C/C++. –  Rup May 16 '11 at 18:38

As soon as return is called, the function call is terminated. It acts like a break. So if your return is in the middle, it would gain some performance because the rest of the function isn't executed.

For the rest, it is often better (in a readability manner) to use an explicit return in stead of a implicit one. If you keep the return in the function, you will know that a call to that function might expect a return value.

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return will break/exit the function (think break as in switch/case)

function someMethod( $someArg ) {
    if(condition) {
        return; // will exit function
    }

    // could be more code
}
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I'm no expert but I would say that if there is a difference in negligible; one could argue that your using up bites by putting return; or return false; at the end of a function.

typically I use return with something like

return true;

or

return $var;

and if i don't want to return anything or I want to return false I just don't use return

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1  
But return; and return false; are very different. –  Rudie May 16 '11 at 14:06
    
yes they are return will return null and return false; will return false; I don't see what your getting at though ? –  mcgrailm May 16 '11 at 14:11
    
You said: "and if i don't want to return anything or I want to return false I just don't use return". Well If you want to return false, you should return something: false. –  Rudie May 16 '11 at 14:12
    
yes but evaluating as boolean i.e. true or false null is the same as false is it not ? –  mcgrailm May 16 '11 at 14:22
    
Yup, we all know it is. But I was looking for specifics in my answer. Doesn't really matter. We both know what we mean. Ocasionally return values "", NULL and FALSE will do very different things. Other times, they do exactly the same. –  Rudie May 16 '11 at 14:33

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