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I want to create custom buttons to use in a TabHost. I haven been trying to just use the same image resource (png), but have the colorfilter change depending on the state. So I made this bit to serve as the layout for the custom button:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<RelativeLayout xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
    android:layout_width="fill_parent" android:layout_height="fill_parent">
    <ImageView android:id="@+id/tab_icon"
        android:layout_centerInParent="true" android:layout_alignParentTop="true"
        android:layout_centerHorizontal="true" android:layout_width="wrap_content"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content"/>
    <TextView android:id="@+id/tab_text" android:layout_below="@id/tab_icon"
        android:layout_centerHorizontal="true" android:layout_width="wrap_content"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content" />
</RelativeLayout>

In my activity, I add the tabs like this:

tabHost.addTab(tabHost.newTabSpec(TAB_NAME_NEWS).setIndicator(buildTab(R.drawable.tab_icon_news, R.string.news))
          .setContent(newsIntent));

And this is the 'buildTab' method:

private final static int[] SELECTED = new int[] { android.R.attr.state_selected };
private final static int[] IDLE = new int[] { -android.R.attr.state_selected };

private View buildTab(int icon, int label) {
    LayoutInflater inflater = LayoutInflater.from(this);
    View view = inflater.inflate(R.layout.tab_button, null);
    StateListDrawable drawable = new StateListDrawable();

    Drawable selected = getResources().getDrawable(icon);
    selected.mutate();
    selected.setBounds(0, 0, selected.getIntrinsicWidth(), selected.getIntrinsicHeight());
    selected.setColorFilter(new LightingColorFilter(0xFFFFFFFF, 0x0000FF00));
    drawable.addState(SELECTED, selected);

    Drawable idle = getResources().getDrawable(icon);
    idle.mutate();
    idle.setColorFilter(new LightingColorFilter(0xFFFFFFFF, 0x000000FF));
    drawable.addState(IDLE, idle);

    ((ImageView) view.findViewById(R.id.tab_icon)).setImageDrawable(drawable);
    ((TextView) view.findViewById(R.id.tab_text)).setText(getString(label));
    return view;
}

In the selected state, the image should be completely green (0x0000FF00), and in the non-selected state, it should be blue (0x000000FF).

The problem is that the colorfilters appear to be be completely ignored. I can not see the colors change under any circumstances.

I've also tried to get the same result by setting the android:tint property on the <ImageView/>, but apparently you cannot use a reference to a <selector> there, since it throws a NumberFormatException.

I don't see what I'm doing wrong so any help would be appreciated.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 10 down vote accepted

OK, I never got the above code to work, so here's what I ended up doing.

First, I subclassed LayerDrawable:

public class StateDrawable extends LayerDrawable {

    public StateDrawable(Drawable[] layers) {
        super(layers);
    }

    @Override
    protected boolean onStateChange(int[] states) {
        for (int state : states) {
            if (state == android.R.attr.state_selected) {
                super.setColorFilter(Color.argb(255, 255, 195, 0), PorterDuff.Mode.SRC_ATOP);
            } else {
                super.setColorFilter(Color.GRAY, PorterDuff.Mode.SRC_ATOP);
            }
        }
        return super.onStateChange(states);
    }

    @Override
    public boolean isStateful() {
        return true;
    }

}

I changed the buildTab() method to the following:

private View buildTab(int icon, int label) {
    LayoutInflater inflater = LayoutInflater.from(this);
    View view = inflater.inflate(R.layout.tab_button, null);
    ((ImageView) view.findViewById(R.id.tab_icon)).setImageDrawable(new StateDrawable(new Drawable[] { getResources()
          .getDrawable(icon) }));
    ((TextView) view.findViewById(R.id.tab_text)).setText(getString(label));
    return view;
}

I still add the tabs like this:

Intent fooIntent = new Intent().setClass(this, FooActivity.class);
tabHost.addTab(tabHost.newTabSpec(TAB_NAME_INFO).setIndicator(buildTab(R.drawable.tab_icon_info, R.string.info)).setContent(infoIntent));

This works for me, compatible with android 1.6.

share|improve this answer
    
suppose i wish to make an imageView that could have the new "StateDrawable" in xml , how could i do it? –  android developer Aug 11 '13 at 12:28
3  
Great answer, but I can suggest an improvement. There is StateSet.stateSetMatches method, which checks whether you drawable state matches desired state or not (instead of manually iterating over array) –  Dmitry Zaitsev Oct 12 '13 at 23:52

Couldn't solve it with applying a colorfilter directly to the drawable either. What worked for me was getting the image as a Bitmap, create an empty second one with same measures, define a canvas for the second one, apply that colorfilter to a paint object and draw the first bitmap on the second one. Finally create a BitmapDrawable from the new Bitmap and you're done. Here is the code

    ImageButton imageButton = (ImageButton)findViewById(R.id.aga);

    Bitmap one = BitmapFactory.decodeResource(getResources(), R.drawable.pen_circle);
    Bitmap oneCopy = Bitmap.createBitmap(one.getWidth(), one.getHeight(), Config.ARGB_8888);

    Canvas c = new Canvas(oneCopy);
    Paint p = new Paint();
    p.setColorFilter(new LightingColorFilter(Color.CYAN, 1));
    c.drawBitmap(one, 0, 0, p);

    StateListDrawable states = new StateListDrawable();
    states.addState(new int[] {android.R.attr.state_pressed}, new BitmapDrawable(oneCopy));
    states.addState(new int[] { }, imageButton.getDrawable());
    imageButton.setImageDrawable(states);
share|improve this answer

This is my class, hacked to support ColorFilter:

Usage:

final Drawable icon = getResources().getDrawable(iconResId);
final Drawable filteredIcon = icon.getConstantState().newDrawable();
final FilterableStateListDrawable selectorDrawable = new FilterableStateListDrawable();
selectorDrawable.addState(ICON_STATE_SELECTED, filteredIcon, new PorterDuffColorFilter(mIconOverlayColor, PorterDuff.Mode.SRC_ATOP));
selectorDrawable.addState(ICON_STATE_DEFAULT, icon);

As you see the ColorFilter is not applied directly to the drawable, it is associated to it while adding a state to the selector Drawable.

The code (dirty, but work for me):

/**
 * This is an extension to {@link android.graphics.drawable.StateListDrawable} that workaround a bug not allowing
 * to set a {@link android.graphics.ColorFilter} to the drawable in one of the states., it add a method
 * {@link #addState(int[], android.graphics.drawable.Drawable, android.graphics.ColorFilter)} for that purpose.
 */
public class FilterableStateListDrawable extends StateListDrawable {

    private int currIdx = -1;
    private int childrenCount = 0;
    private SparseArray<ColorFilter> filterMap;

    public FilterableStateListDrawable() {
        super();
        filterMap = new SparseArray<ColorFilter>();
    }

    @Override
    public void addState(int[] stateSet, Drawable drawable) {
        super.addState(stateSet, drawable);
        childrenCount++;
    }

    /**
     * Same as {@link #addState(int[], android.graphics.drawable.Drawable)}, but allow to set a colorFilter associated to this Drawable.
     *
     * @param stateSet    - An array of resource Ids to associate with the image.
     *                    Switch to this image by calling setState().
     * @param drawable    -The image to show.
     * @param colorFilter - The {@link android.graphics.ColorFilter} to apply to this state
     */
    public void addState(int[] stateSet, Drawable drawable, ColorFilter colorFilter) {
        int currChild = childrenCount;
        addState(stateSet, drawable);
        filterMap.put(currChild, colorFilter);
    }

    @Override
    public boolean selectDrawable(int idx) {
        if (currIdx != idx) {
            setColorFilter(getColorFilterForIdx(idx));
        }
        boolean result = super.selectDrawable(idx);
        if (getCurrent() != null) {
            currIdx = result ? idx : currIdx;
            if (!result) {
                setColorFilter(getColorFilterForIdx(currIdx));
            }
        } else if (getCurrent() == null) {
            currIdx = -1;
            setColorFilter(null);
        }
        return result;
    }

    private ColorFilter getColorFilterForIdx(int idx) {
        return filterMap != null ? filterMap.get(idx) : null;
    }
}

I've opened a bug about this: https://code.google.com/p/android/issues/detail?id=60183

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Here is my variation of Mopper's code. The idea is that ImageView gets color filter when user touches it, and color filter is removed when user stops touching it.

class PressedEffectStateListDrawable extends StateListDrawable {

    private int selectionColor;

    public PressedEffectStateListDrawable(Drawable drawable, int selectionColor) {
        super();
        this.selectionColor = selectionColor;
        addState(new int[] { android.R.attr.state_pressed }, drawable);
        addState(new int[] {}, drawable);
    }

    @Override
    protected boolean onStateChange(int[] states) {
        boolean isStatePressedInArray = false;
        for (int state : states) {
            if (state == android.R.attr.state_pressed) {
                isStatePressedInArray = true;
            }
        }
        if (isStatePressedInArray) {
            super.setColorFilter(selectionColor, PorterDuff.Mode.MULTIPLY);
        } else {
            super.clearColorFilter();
        }
        return super.onStateChange(states);
    }

    @Override
    public boolean isStateful() {
        return true;
    }
}

usage:

Drawable drawable = new FastBitmapDrawable(bm);
imageView.setImageDrawable(new PressedEffectStateListDrawable(drawable, 0xFF33b5e5));
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Take a look at this source code in Mark Murphy's Advanced Android Development. This example explains how to use StateListDrawables:

Drawable

All of chapter 4 of that book discusses Drawables and there is another example in Chapter 6, the example about interactive maps. It's the ILuvNooYawk example that shows how to use 2 different images when in different button states.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the effort, but the approach in the source you linked uses multiple image resources for the same button. My goal was to use the same image resource for all button states, and change its appearance depending on state by applying a colorfilter. –  Mopper May 20 '11 at 12:23

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