Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Are there any data binding frameworks (BCL or otherwise) that allow binding between any two CLR properties that implement INotifyPropertyChanged and INotifyCollectionChanged? It seems to be it should be possible to do something like this:

var binding = new Binding();
binding.Source = someSourceObject;
binding.SourcePath = "Customer.Name";
binding.Target = someTargetObject;
binding.TargetPath = "Client.Name";
BindingManager.Bind(binding);

Where someSourceObject and someTargetObject are just POCOs that implement INotifyPropertyChanged. However, I am unaware of any BCL support for this, and am not sure if there are existing frameworks that permit this.

UPDATE: Given that there is no existing library available, I have taken it upon myself to write my own. It is available here.

Thanks

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 10 down vote accepted

I wrote Truss to fill the void.

share|improve this answer

If you defined your properties as DependencyProperty's you could do it. Both WF and WPF have an implementation of it (first link is for WPF. For WF it is this one) so you need to decide which to use - but both should suffice for your needs.

share|improve this answer
1  
DependencyProperty implies inheriting from DependencyObject, which is not a POCO. –  Kent Boogaart Mar 11 '09 at 14:16
    
+1. In other words, "You can't with poco's, only DPs." –  Will Mar 11 '09 at 14:30
    
Eh? Not sure what your logic is for voting this up Will. Neither suggestion will suffice for my needs as neither suggestion involves POCOs. Another post has already shown you can do it with POCOs - I'm just asking for a framework that does the hard lifting. –  Kent Boogaart Mar 11 '09 at 14:52

I'm not aware of any library that does this - but you could write your own fairly easily.

Here's a basis I knocked up in a few minutes that establishes two way data binding between two simple properties:

public static class Binder
{

    public static void Bind(
        INotifyPropertyChanged source,
        string sourcePropertyName,
        INotifyPropertyChanged target,
        string targetPropertyName)
    {
        var sourceProperty
            = source.GetType().GetProperty(sourcePropertyName);
        var targetProperty
            = target.GetType().GetProperty(targetPropertyName);

        source.PropertyChanged +=
            (s, a) =>
            {
                var sourceValue = sourceProperty.GetValue(source, null);
                var targetValue = targetProperty.GetValue(target, null);
                if (!Object.Equals(sourceValue, targetValue))
                {
                    targetProperty.SetValue(target, sourceValue, null);
                }
            };

        target.PropertyChanged +=
            (s, a) =>
            {
                var sourceValue = sourceProperty.GetValue(source, null);
                var targetValue = targetProperty.GetValue(target, null);
                if (!Object.Equals(sourceValue, targetValue))
                {
                    sourceProperty.SetValue(source, targetValue, null);
                }
            };
    }
}

Of course, this code lacks a few niceties. Things to add include

  • Checking that source and target are assigned
  • Checking that the properties identified by sourcePropertyName and targetPropertyName exist
  • Checking for type compatibility between the two properties

Also, Reflection is relatively slow (though benchmark it before discarding it, it's not that slow), so you might want to use compiled expressions instead.

Lastly, given that specifying properties by string is error prone, you could use Linq expressions and extension methods instead. Then instead of writing

Binder.Bind( source, "Name", target, "Name")

you could write

source.Bind( Name => target.Name);
share|improve this answer
    
I was actually asking because I was considering writing my own. Didn't want to reinvent the wheel and all...thanks. –  Kent Boogaart Mar 10 '09 at 9:21
    
Update: I have linked to my library in the question. –  Kent Boogaart Apr 23 '09 at 7:25
    
I needed a simple barebone databinding class for my current project-in-a-hurry, and the one above nearly fits what I need. I just replaced the property names used with Reflection by two Action delegates in which I get/set from the POCO and apply transformations and formatting. I will definitely give a good try to Truss in a next project, because it sounds really interresting to me. –  Larry Nov 17 '10 at 13:53
    
Hello, a little late (it's 2012), but don't you think the event source.PropertyChanged would be raised for any property change in the source and we are interested only in one property? Is it good performance wise? –  thewpfguy Jun 13 '12 at 7:23
    
@thewpfguy, when the PropertyChanged event fires, there are three cases to handle: Our property; Not our property; and every property (Empty string). In theory, as you identified, we should write code that identifies which case is happening and react accordingly. In practice, we're talking about saving only microseconds of CPU time. When we're talking about duration on a human perceptible scale, those microseconds just don't matter. If you're throwing thousands of PropertyChanged notifications every second, your code has bigger problems. –  Bevan Jun 13 '12 at 20:22

Maybe Bindable LINQ or continuous linq can help here. If you're trying to add model properties that are actually "derived properties" of your actual, updating data, to make it easier for you UI to bind to, these two frameworks should help.

share|improve this answer

AutoMapper can copy values between two instances, but you have to write your own code to make this happen automatically.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.