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Locking down state is great. In C# you can ensure that a field doesn't change it's value/reference once the constructor completes by declaring it as readonly.

class Foo
{
    private readonly string _foo;

    public Foo() {
        _foo = "Unchangeable";
    }

    public void ChangeIt() {
        _foo = "Darn";        // compiler error
    }
}

Can I do the same thing with C++? If so, how? If not, why not?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 8 down vote accepted

That would be const. Note that this keyword means a couple of different things in different contexts.

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Both links are pretty good (pre/post edit.) Thanks very much. –  Drew Noakes May 16 '11 at 16:57
    
Both describe basically the same thing, but the new one is much less negative about the whole thing. Since I like const, I prefer linking to the neutral description ;) If you like my answer, perhaps you could accept it? –  jackrabbit May 16 '11 at 17:01
    
Patience my friend. I generally let a question sit for a while before accepting it to see what other answers surface. Once a question is answered it tends to garner less attention from passers-by. Enjoy the suspense. –  Drew Noakes May 16 '11 at 18:11
    
Good strategy - never thought of that (haven't needed to, since I haven't asked a question yet). –  jackrabbit May 16 '11 at 21:04

A reference in C++ is not rebindable, so it's equivalent to a C# readonly reference.

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The reference cannot be changed. However, the thing the reference points to can be changed. A member std::string &s can be changed perfectly well and the change would propagate to everyone using it. –  delnan May 16 '11 at 16:40
    
@delnan: C#'s readonly works the same way, a readonly StringBuilder can have its contents changed but not be bound to a different StringBuilder. –  BCoates May 16 '11 at 16:45
    
No, not really. References can be changed to refer to a completely different object, while a readonly field always refer to the same thing even though this thing may change its internal state. For reference types, it may work similar enough in practice. But the difference is plainly visible with value types, which can be changed with C++ references but not with C# readonly fields. –  delnan May 16 '11 at 16:51
    
C# readonly for value types is an entirely different thing than it is for reference types. C++ references cannot point to a different object once bound, but changing the value of an int is not pointing to a different object in C++. –  BCoates May 16 '11 at 17:04
    
The point is: x = 0; isn't supposed to work. With C++ references, it does. With a C# readonly field, it doesn't. (But to nitpick, you're still wrong unless you consider the location - e.g. variable - the reference refers to an "object", which might be valid but isn't useful and beyond what "object" refers to in other languages.) –  delnan May 16 '11 at 17:09

C++ has const, which does the same job as readonly in C#.

const int Constant1 = 96;    
Constant1 = 200   // Compiler Error.
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Is const for a local variable (as this example seems to show) the same as const for a field, as in the original question? –  Drew Noakes May 16 '11 at 18:12

There is no such thing directly. You can use a private field with a public getter (but no setter). But that would only apply to other classes calling your code. Foo always has full acces to its members. But since you are the implementer of Foo, this is no real problem.

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class Foo
{
private:
    const string _foo;
public:
    Foo() : _foo("Unchangeable")
    {
    }
    void ChangeIt()
    {
        _foo = "Darn";        // compiler error
    }
};
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The note about identifiers starting with an underscore isn't 100% correct. –  dalle May 16 '11 at 16:45
    
@dalle, it appears you're correct - they're only reserved in the global namespace, not within the context of a class. I'll fix my answer. stackoverflow.com/questions/228783/… –  Mark Ransom May 16 '11 at 16:47
    
+1, but sorry for being picky. –  dalle May 16 '11 at 16:51
    
@dalle, no need to apologize. Every time I get corrected I learn something, and I appreciate it. –  Mark Ransom May 16 '11 at 16:56

It was not immediately clear to me after reading the accepted answer that to make exact equivalent of readonly keyword you need to declare the member like this:

class Y
{
public:
     void mutate() { x = 7; } // not const member
     int x;
};

class X
{
private:
    Y * const member; // this only makes the pointer to Y const, 
                      // but you can still modify the object itself
public:
    X(Y *m) : member(m) {}

    void f() { member->mutate(); }
};

Hope this helps.

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