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I want to write an abstract method but the compiler persistently gives this error:

abstract methods cannot have a body

I have a method like this:

public abstract boolean isChanged() {
    return smt else...
}

What is wrong here?

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5  
The compiler is telling you exactly what's wrong. It's being persistent because you're trying to compile invalid code. Out of interest, what do you think make a method abstract, if you're providing it with a body? –  Jon Skeet May 16 '11 at 16:52
    
What are you trying to accomplish by declaring the method abstract? –  Ted Hopp May 16 '11 at 16:52
    
@jon @ ted,i have an abstract class and i want to write an abstract method in that class. –  caner May 16 '11 at 17:02
1  
Fine. Just don't provide a body to the method. –  Jon Skeet May 16 '11 at 17:14
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3 Answers 3

up vote 23 down vote accepted

Abstract methods means there is no default implementation for it and an implementing class will provide the details.

Essentially, you would have

class AbstractObject {
   public void abstract method();
}

class ImplementingObject extends AbstractObject {
  public void method() {
    doSomething();
  }
}

So, it's exactly as the error states: your abstract method can not have a body.

There's a full tutorial on Oracle's site at: http://download.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/IandI/abstract.html

The reason you would do something like this would do something like this is if multiple objects can share some behavior, but not all behavior.

A very simple example would be shapes:

You can have a generic graphic object, which knows how to reposition itself, but the implementing classes will actually draw themselves.

(This is taken from the site I linked above)

abstract class GraphicObject {
    int x, y;
    ...
    void moveTo(int newX, int newY) {
        ...
    }
    abstract void draw();
    abstract void resize();
}

class Circle extends GraphicObject {
    void draw() {
        ...
    }
    void resize() {
        ...
    }
}
class Rectangle extends GraphicObject {
    void draw() {
        ...
    }
    void resize() {
        ...
    }
}
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If you use the java keyword abstract you cannot provide an implementation.

Sometimes this idea comes from having a background in C++ and mistaking the virtual keyword in C++ as being "almost the same" as the abstract keyword in Java.

In C++ virtual indicates that a method can be overridden and polymorphism will follow, but abstract in Java is not the same thing. In Java abstract is more like a pure virtual method, or one where the implementation must be provided by a subclass. Since Java supports polymorphism without the need to declare it, all methods are virtual from a C++ point of view. So if you want to provide a method that might be overridden, just write it as a "normal" method.

Now to protect a method from being overridden, Java uses the keyword final in coordination with the method declaration to indicate that subclasses cannot override the method.

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2  
+1 - great points. –  duffymo May 16 '11 at 17:03
    
Fro a C++ perspective, it's like having public: virtual bool isChanged() = 0 { return smt else... }, which is legal. abstract is like the = 0 bit. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline May 16 '11 at 17:07
    
Good job explaining why he might be confused, –  Reverend Gonzo May 16 '11 at 17:32
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The error message tells the exact reason: "abstract methods cannot have a body".

They can only be defined in abstract classes and interfaces (interface methods are implicitly abstract!) and the idea is, that the subclass implements the method.

Example:

 public abstract class AbstractGreeter {
   public abstract String getHelloMessage();

   public void sayHello() {
     System.out.println(getHelloMessage());
   }
 }

 public class FrenchGreeter extends AbstractGreeter{

   // we must implement the abstract method
   @Override
   public String getHelloMessage() {
     return "bonjour";
   }
 }
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