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I'm having a problem deleting data of a vector.

When I create the data, I first reserve space in an array, and then resize the vector and copy the addresses of the array:

//Create the vertices
   verts.reserve(vn); verts.resize(vn);
   TriVertex *vertsaux = new TriVertex[vn];

   for(int i=0, c=0; i<vn; i++, c+=3)
   {
      vertsaux[i].SetId(i);
      vertsaux[i].SetCoords0(Vector3(vs[c], vs[c+1], vs[c+2]));

      //Inicializate texture vertices
      vertsaux[i].SetTextureCoords(Vector2(0.0f, 0.0f));
   }

   for(int i=0; i<vn; i++)
   {
      verts[i] = &vertsaux[i];
   }

But in the destructor of my class, it gives me a runtime error when I do this:

for (i=0; i < this->verts.size(); i++) {
       delete this->verts[i];
   }

Anybody know why can this be happening? Thanks!

PS: By the way, I can't just create new TriVertex inside the for, because of some implementation details...

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1  
What does your declaration of verts look like? Is it vector<TriVertex> or vector<TriVertex*>? –  Joe May 16 '11 at 18:15
    
verts.reserve(vn); verts.resize(vn); is redundant. All vector operations that grow the vector will do the reserve for you. You use .reserve(N) only when you'd grow the vector incrementally, know a minimum final size, and don't want the intermediate reservations. –  MSalters May 17 '11 at 7:42
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6 Answers

You allocate an array of objects with

TriVertex *vertsaux = new TriVertex[vn];

To delete that again you need to do

delete[] vertsaux;

You can not delete the elements individually.

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 delete this->verts[i];

This deletes one item inside the dynamically allocated array you created and is actually UB to delete it that way.

An array like that should be deleted with delete[] statement, and that deletes the entire array

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But verts is a STL vector. Do I have to do that with vectors too? –  Sara May 16 '11 at 18:12
    
this->verts[i]; deletes an item in the array you placed inside verts, not verts itself –  Tony The Lion May 16 '11 at 18:45
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When you allocate an array using

TriVertex *vertsaux = new TriVertex[vn];

you have to deallocate using delete[] by calling

delete[] vertsaux;
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Since you create an array of TriVertex, pointed to by vertsaux, then you should delete the array using:

delete[] vertsaux;

You can't delete the individual elements of the array.

Having done the above delete[], you should remove all the elements of verts like this:

verts.clear();

This is because since you have deleted vertsaux, the pointers inside verts are invalid.

I'm assuming that verts is something like: std::vector<TriVertex*>

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Ok. So is it correct if I do this?: delete [] verts[0]; Or is there memory that is not being deleted? –  Sara May 16 '11 at 18:17
    
@Sara: I don't think that you should do the delete[] verts[0], just for the sake of consistency. –  quamrana May 16 '11 at 18:21
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There are two things here:

1) As a number of people have pointed out, allocating an array requires deleting as an array. However, I think it's masking what you're really trying to do here. Change your allocation to do a "new TriVertex" for each item.

2) Assuming your vector is storing TriVertex* pointers, you indeed have to delete each item in your destructor (as you have written.)

Thus, fixing your initial allocation strategy for TriVertex objects should solve the problem.

   for(int i=0, c=0; i<vn; i++, c+=3)
   {
      TriVertex *vertsaux = new TriVertex;

      vertsaux->SetId(i);
      vertsaux->SetCoords0(Vector3(vs[c], vs[c+1], vs[c+2]));

      //Inicializate texture vertices
      vertsaux->SetTextureCoords(Vector2(0.0f, 0.0f));
      verts[i] = vertsaux;
   }
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You're not really giving us enough information. What it the type of verts? And why are you using versaux? From what little I can see, the most logical solution would be to have std::vector <TriVertex> verts; as a class member, and initialize it directly, without the intermediate dynamic allocations. Maybe:

verts.reserve(vn);

for ( int i = 0; i < vn; ++ i ) {
    verts.push_back( TriVertex() );
    TriVertex& current = verts.back();
    current.SetId( i );
    current.SetCoords( Vector3( *vs, *(vs+1), *(vs+ 2) ) );

    current.SetTextureCoords( Vector2( 0.0, 0.0 ) );
    vs += 3;
}

I don't see any reason for the intermediate, dynamically allocated array. (If there is, Joe's response is correct.)

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