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A project on GitHub that I have a fork of has a new pull requests that I want to pull into my fork that the author has not pulled in yet.

Is there a simple way to apply pull request from other forks into my fork? Is there something else here that I am missing?

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2  
There is an instruction: gist.github.com/piscisaureus/3342247 –  Piotr Migdal Nov 4 '13 at 11:41
    
Does this reflect on the network graph at GitHub if you use git commands to do it? –  ADTC Aug 1 at 17:53

5 Answers 5

up vote 111 down vote accepted

You can do it manually quite easily:

  • add the other fork as a remote of your repo:

    git remote add otherfork git://github.com/request-author/project.git
    
  • fetch his repo's commits

    git fetch otherfork
    
  • You have then two options to apply the pull request (if you don't want to choose pick 1.)

    1. If you don't care about applying also the eventual commits that have been added between the origin and the pull request, you can just rebase the branch on which the pull request was formed

      git rebase master otherfork/pullrequest-branch
      
    2. If you only want the commits in the pull request, identify their SHA1 and do

      git cherry-pick <first-SHA1> <second-SHA1> <etc.>
      
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This is exactly what I needed - thanks! –  leek May 16 '11 at 19:40
76  
Actually, you shouldn't use cherry-pick, it creates new commits... which in turn will cause confusion if you send a pull request upstream. Instead you should merge just like the pull request is asking to do. You don't need to add a remote either. git pull URL branchname –  Tekkub May 16 '11 at 20:28
2  
@Tekkub: agree, it may be better to avoid confusion with newly created commits. Merge is less elegant in my mind since you can bring other changes from the branch you're merging with –  CharlesB May 16 '11 at 21:52
7  
Aye, but in this case he specifically asked how to pull the pull request into his fork. Pull == merge. –  Tekkub May 16 '11 at 22:10
    
@CharlesB, since GitHub automatically adds new commits on the same branch to a pull request, wouldn't it be hard to get any "other changes" (assuming the requester follows best practices and put the changes on a separate branch from continued development so that all of the commits are relevant), unless what you're getting at is when you want only part of a pull request? –  neverfox Jun 3 '13 at 20:04

Like Tekkub said previously, you can just pull the branch in directly. Most of the time with GitHub, the branch is simply "master" on the requesting User's fork of the project.

Example: git pull https://github.com/USER/PROJECT/ BRANCH

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Downside of this is that the branch may have other things in it besides the pull request. Also, you have to look up the proper URL for the pull request author's fork. If you want to use a one-liner, better to use git pull https://github.com/{upstream/project} refs/pull/{id}/head instead. –  jbyler Oct 20 at 22:45

What I would do is the following;

git checkout master
git remote add #NAME# #ADDRESS TO REPO#
git fetch #USERNAME#
git checkout -b test_fork
git rebase #NAME#/#BRANCH#

I have now merged the changes into a test branch, named test_fork. So that any changes won't dirty my tree.

Optionally you can use cherry-pick as described above to pick a particular commit if that is more preferable.

Happy travels :)

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Some more detailed info that worked for me.

My .git/config file for the forked repo looks like this:

[core]
        repositoryformatversion = 0
        filemode = true
        bare = false
        logallrefupdates = true
        ignorecase = true
        precomposeunicode = false
[remote "origin"]
        url = git@github.com:litzinger/angular-carousel.git
        fetch = +refs/heads/*:refs/remotes/origin/*
[branch "master"]
        remote = origin
        merge = refs/heads/master
        rebase = true
[remote "source"]
        url = git://github.com/revolunet/angular-carousel.git
        fetch = +refs/heads/*:refs/remotes/source/*
        fetch = +refs/pull/*/head:refs/remotes/origin/pr/*

Then run "git fetch source", which then listed all the pull requests from the forked repo.

 * [new ref]         refs/pull/54/head -> origin/pr/54
 * [new ref]         refs/pull/67/head -> origin/pr/67
 * [new ref]         refs/pull/69/head -> origin/pr/69
 * [new ref]         refs/pull/71/head -> origin/pr/71

And then to merge in a specific pull request run "git merge master origin/pr/67"

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I edited my .git/config and added the [remote "source"] lines but for the project I was interested in, and instructions worked flawlessly. I love this answer. –  philo vivero Aug 13 at 17:53

Pull requests for the project may come from many different authors (forks), and you probably don't want a separate remote for each fork. Also, you don't want to make any assumptions about the branch the author used when submitting the pull request, or what else might be in the author's master branch. So it's better to reference the pull request as it appears in the upstream repository, rather than as it appears in the other forks.

Step 1:

git remote add upstream <url>

You've probably already done this step, but if not, you'll want a remote defined for the upstream project. The URL is the clone URL of the project you forked. More info at Configuring a remote for a fork and Syncing a fork. upstream is the name you are giving to the remote, and while it can be anything, upstream is the conventional name.

Step 2:

git pull upstream refs/pull/{id}/head

... where {id} is the pull request number. upstream is the name of the remote to pull from, i.e. just "upstream" if you followed step 1 exactly. It can also be a URL, in which case you can skip step 1.

Step 3:

Type in a commit message for the merge commit. You can keep the default, although I recommend giving a nice one-line summary with the pull request number, the issue it fixes, and a short description:

Merge PR#42, fixing VIM-652, support for mapping arbitrary IDEA actions
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Also see a related answer with a variant that creates a local branch with the pull request in it. And a final variant: you can use git pull upstream refs/pull/{id}/head to get the commits into your local repo, then reference them as FETCH_HEAD (e.g. git log ..FETCH_HEAD to see what's in it, then git merge FETCH_HEAD) –  jbyler Oct 20 at 22:51

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