Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm iterating over a list of elements in Python, do some action on it, and then remove them if they meet certain criteria.

for element in somelist:
    do_action(element)
    if check(element):
        remove_element_from_list

What should I use in place of remove_element? I have seen similar questions asked, but notice the presence of the do_action part that is to be executed for all elements and thus eliminates the solution of using filters.

share|improve this question
2  
Can't you split it in two steps i.e. for all elements do the action, then remove elements ? –  digEmAll May 16 '11 at 20:16
4  
You should NEVER delete an element from a list while iterating over it in a for loop. You could use a while loop instead. Or, record the indices of all the elements you want to remove and then delete them after the iteration is complete –  inspectorG4dget May 16 '11 at 20:17
    
For all: I need to modify the list in place, no copies. Actually the list is passed to a function and the list needs to be modified by that function. –  Scrontch May 16 '11 at 20:28
    
@Scrontch, it's still possible (and better) to loop through the list and then replace it's contents as a second pass . That is why I use [:] in my answer –  gnibbler May 16 '11 at 20:39
1  
@inspectorG4dget: Your first sentence is untenable -- see my answer. –  John Machin May 16 '11 at 23:53

9 Answers 9

up vote 23 down vote accepted

You could always iterate over a copy of the list, leaving you free to modify the original:

for item in list(somelist):
  ...
  somelist.remove(item)
share|improve this answer
1  
@Scrontch Given you additional criteria of "modify the list in place", this looks like the cleanest solution. As some have mentioned, you don't want to iterate over the same list you're modifying. –  John Gaines Jr. May 16 '11 at 20:41
1  
Ok, but it seems not to be performing well at all. Won't this be O(n^2)? (And that is not counting the initial list copy). Removing the element on the fly would be O(n). –  Scrontch May 16 '11 at 20:52
1  
Scrontch - the only performance hit is from copying the list, you're still removing the element 'on the fly' - the inner code references somelist which is the original list. –  bluepnume May 16 '11 at 20:55
4  
using map (or list comprehensions) for side effects and throwing away the result is not very pythonic –  gnibbler May 16 '11 at 21:40
3  
The alternative implementation is wrong. You will need to reverse 'toremove' before the map function. Otherwise later indices point to wrong objects. –  akkishore Nov 22 '12 at 11:51

To meet these criteria: modify original list in situ, no list copies, only one pass, works, a traditional solution is to iterate backwards:

for i in xrange(len(somelist) - 1, -1, -1):
    element = somelist[i]
    do_action(element)
    if check(element):
        del somelist[i]

Bonus: Doesn't do len(somelist) on each iteration. Works on any version of Python (at least as far back as 1.5.2) ... s/xrange/range/ for 3.X.

Update: If you want to iterate forwards, it's possible, just trickier and uglier:

i = 0
n = len(somelist)
while i < n:
    element = somelist[i]
    do_action(element)
    if check(element):
        del somelist[i]
        n = n - 1
    else:
        i = i + 1
share|improve this answer
1  
+50: a nice, elegant solution to this problem –  Claudiu Jun 12 '13 at 19:48
2  
You could also use reversed(range(len(somelist))) to make it look a bit nicer –  Ben Ruijl Feb 20 at 22:02

List comp:

results = [x for x in (do_action(element) for element in somelist) if check(element)]
share|improve this answer
    
but the OP wants to call the "check" function after calling do_action –  Riccardo Galli May 16 '11 at 20:30
    
Oops, good point, corrected. –  zeekay May 16 '11 at 21:15
for element in somelist:
    do_action(element)
somelist[:] = (x for x in somelist if not check(x))

If you really need to do it in one pass without copying the list

i=0
while i < len(somelist):
    element = somelist[i] 
    do_action(element)
    if check(element):
        del somelist[i]
    else:
        i+=1
share|improve this answer
2  
Also you could use a generator expression, then no temporary list is built: somelist[:] = (x for x in somelist if not check(element)) –  pillmuncher May 16 '11 at 20:45
    
@pillmuncher, good idea –  gnibbler May 16 '11 at 20:58
    
-1 Elementary code review says "Doesn't work". –  John Machin May 16 '11 at 23:31
    
@John, ah well the idea was there. That's what I get for writing untested code at 6:30 before my coffee –  gnibbler May 16 '11 at 23:39

You can still use filter, moving to an outside function the element modification (iterating just once)

def do_the_magic(x):
    do_action(x)
    return check(x)

# you can get a different filtered list
filter(do_the_magic,yourList)

# or have it modified in place (as suggested by Steven Rumbalski, see comment)
yourList[:] = itertools.ifilter(do_the_magic, yourList)
share|improve this answer
1  
Your arguments to filter are in the wrong order. Also, he wants the list modified in place, so use itertools.ifilter and assign to a slice: yourList[:] = itertools.ifilter(do_the_magic, yourList) –  Steven Rumbalski May 17 '11 at 1:19
    
thanks, fixed the order. I didn't notice the "in place" requirement –  Riccardo Galli May 17 '11 at 7:31

You can make a generator that returns everything that isn't removed:

def newlist(somelist):
    for element in somelist:
        do_action(element)
        if not check(element):
            yield element
share|improve this answer
    
Except the OP want the list modified in place, presumably there are other references to it, so creating a filtered copy doesn't solve the whole problem. –  Paul McGuire May 17 '11 at 5:34
    
@Paul, it's a little unfair to judge by criteria that weren't part of the original question. The hard requirement to do the update in-place came in a comment after I gave this answer. –  Mark Ransom May 17 '11 at 13:16
    
true, I see this all the time with the parsing questions. There is a process of discovery, since the original question usually leaves out 1 or 12 (or 12!) vital bits of information. –  Paul McGuire May 17 '11 at 13:21
    
To make this in-place assign to a slice: somelist[:] = (x for x in newlist(someList)) –  Steven Rumbalski May 17 '11 at 15:30

Another way of doing so is:

while i<len(your_list):
    if #condition :
        del your_list[i]
    else:
        i+=1

So, you delete the elements side by side while checking

share|improve this answer

Why not rewrite it to be

for element in somelist: 
   do_action(element)  

if check(element): 
    remove_element_from_list

See this question for how to remove from the list, though it looks like you've already seen that Remove items from a list while iterating in Python

Another option is to do this if you really want to keep this the same

newlist = [] 
for element in somelist: 
   do_action(element)  

   if not check(element): 
      newlst.append(element)
share|improve this answer

Not exactly in-place, but some idea to do it:

a = ['a', 'b']

def inplace(a):
    c = []
    while len(a) > 0:
        e = a.pop(0)
        if e == 'b':
            c.append(e)
    a.extend(c)

You can extend the function to call you filter in the condition.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.