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Well the question is self explanatory.

In PHP when do I use the if/endif notation instead of the standard if(something){} notation?

Example:

<?php if($a == 5): ?>
A is equal to 5
<?php endif; ?>

Versus:

<?php if($a == 5){ ?>
A is equal to 5
<?php } ?>
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im gonna guess for templating, but i feel like im wrong –  Ascherer May 16 '11 at 21:06
4  
I thought it was for VB programmers... ;-) –  Alnitak May 16 '11 at 21:09
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6 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Others have given the answer "for templating", but haven't really explained why. Curly braces are great for denoting blocks, but they kind of rely on indentation to be read clearly. So this is fairly clear:

<?php
if (1 == 2)
{
    while (1 < 2)
    {
        doSomething();
    }
}

It's obvious which brace matches which.

If, however, you're going into an HTML block, you're probably going to stop indenting cleanly. For instance:

<?php
if (1 != 2) { ?>
<div>This always happens! <?php while (true) { ?>
  <p>This is going to cause an infinite loop!</p>
<?php }
}

That's hard to follow. If you use the endif style, it looks a little cleaner:

<?php
if (1 != 2): ?>
<div>This always happens! <?php while (true): ?>
  <p>This is going to cause an infinite loop!</p>
<?php endwhile;
endif;

The content of the code shows more clearly what's being done. For this limited case, it's more legible.

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@lonesomeday, how do you do nested if's in that last example? –  Neal May 16 '11 at 21:17
    
@Neal Not sure I understand the question... –  lonesomeday May 16 '11 at 21:18
    
if(something){do something if(something2){//do something2}else {}} how do i do that with the shorter notation? –  Neal May 16 '11 at 21:19
    
if(something): doSomething(); if (something2): doSomething2(); else: endif; endif; It's not exactly great, I agree. I, like Edorian basically never use this syntax. –  lonesomeday May 16 '11 at 21:25
    
I don't use it either, i am basically asking if I would, should i, also you left out the else in your example –  Neal May 16 '11 at 21:25
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You can use both, but preffered style and currently known style is the standard if(expr).

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Short answer:

Always use if($something) { } and pretty much never use if/endif. It's standard since PHP 4.0.0 and while the old syntax is not going away this is the one everybody expects.

If you are really looking for a case where you can use if/endif then it's when using php as a template language.

Some people like something like this:

<?php if ($foo): ?>
Hi There
<?php else: ?>
cya!
<?php endif; ?>

better than

<?php if ($foo) { ?>
Hi There
<?php } else { ?>
cya!
<?php } ?>

and imho it is because every line "speaks" and that can be helpful when there is a lot of html inbetween the php tags.

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1  
I don't think this is true; it's not that if {} is a standard, per se, it's just that it's preferred for readability in some places. For example, in a template: <?php if ($var) { ?>yay!<?php } ?> is just plain ugly, compared to <?php if ($var): ?>yay!<?php endif; ?>. Note that the official documentation doesn't note any deprecations or notices even. –  Jimmy Sawczuk May 16 '11 at 21:12
    
@Jimmy i tried to say that the old syntax is not going away with "and while the old syntax is not going away". Was that not clear? Sorry! And i personally agree with you on the syntax choice in templates, but I've heard from other people that they don't like it so i didn't want to talk in absolutes here –  edorian May 16 '11 at 21:13
    
Agree 100%. I'll also add though that if you indent your code properly, you should never have a problem telling where the block starts and ends. Which therefore negates one of the primary reasons for using endif... –  ircmaxell May 16 '11 at 21:41
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I mostly use if/endif when stopping and starting the php code block in between, so nearly always when raw html is being outputted.

For example:

<?php if ($n == 3): ?>
Lorem ipsum.
<?php endif; ?>

This looks, at least in my opinion, better than the following:

<?php if ($n == 3) { ?>
Lorem ipsum.
<?php } ?>
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It is a stylistic choice. They are analogous and one is not better than another.

The former can be good in certain circumstances because it may be easier to read when mired in the middle of an HTML block set.

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Both methods are acceptable. Some people maintain that the alternative syntax (endif) is more legible in templates. IMHO, with a modern syntax coloring/highlighting error, that no longer holds true. Just pick a style and stick with it.

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