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I'm doing some house cleaning and thought I would ask for some suggested practices in PHP as I re-factor my classes. In particular, I have some class constants which fall into categories and I would like to know some good ways to group the ones which share a common purpose.

An Example:

class MySquare {
  // Colors
  const COLOR_GREEN = "green";
  const COLOR_RED = "red";

  // Widths
  const WIDTH_SMALL = 100;
  const WIDTH_MEDIUM = 500;
  const WIDTH_BIG = 1000;

  // Heights
  const HEIGHT_SMALL = 100;
  const HEIGHT_MEDIUM = 300;
  const HEIGHT_BIG = 500;
}

Obviously this works, but it seems like there are probably plenty of options when it comes to grouping related constants, and I bet this is inferior to most. How would you do it?

share|improve this question
    
that is basically how i do it. –  Neal May 16 '11 at 21:32
    
The newer recommended method is to use namespaces instead of a class to hold a series of values. The class method works, but it's an abuse of the OOP system. –  Marc B May 16 '11 at 21:34
    
@MarcB this suggestion intrigues me, but unfortunately I'm not sure what it would actually look like. (not to beg for an answer if you don't have time, but if you do have a minute and could give an example that would be awesome). In the mean time I'll do some reading up on PHP namespaces. –  slifty May 16 '11 at 21:37

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

There are many PHP Conventions, and all of them contradict. But I do use a similar notation, although I like to group the constants per class, so I would have a class Height (or MySquare_Height) which has the constants. This way, I can use it as a kind of Enum like you got in other languages. Especially when you use an editor with highlighting.

<?
abstract class MySquare_Color
{
  const GREEN = 'Green';
  const RED = 'Red';
}

abstract class MySquare_Height 
{
  const SMALL = 100;
  const MEDIUM = 300;
  const BIG = 500;
}

If you'r using PHP 5.3, you can just name the classes Color and Height and put them in a MySquare namespace:

<?php
// Namespace MySquare with subnamespace Width containing the constants.
namespace MySquare\Width
{
    const SMALL = 100;
    const MEDIUM = 300;
}

namespace
{
  // Refer to it fromout another namespace
  echo MySquare\Width\SMALL;
}


?>
share|improve this answer
    
Added the namespace solution on request. –  GolezTrol May 16 '11 at 22:32

As variant, you can create some interfaces, where you can define constants. More code, but... grouped :)

interface IColorsConstants
{
    const COLOR_GREEN = "green";
    const COLOR_RED = "red";
}

interface IWidths
{
    const WIDTH_SMALL = 100;
    const WIDTH_MEDIUM = 500;
    const WIDTH_BIG = 1000;
}

interface IHeights
{
    const HEIGHT_SMALL = 100;
    const HEIGHT_MEDIUM = 300;
    const HEIGHT_BIG = 500;
}

class MySquare implements IColorsConstants, IHeights, IWidths
{

}
share|improve this answer
    
Nice solution, and it works too. Too bad the code completion of my tool (PHPDesigner 7) won't recognise interface constants, but only class constants. :( –  GolezTrol May 16 '11 at 22:24
1  
@GolezTrol try to use NetBeans or PhpStorm. I hope PHP Designer sometime will grow up to alternative of these IDEs. –  OZ_ May 16 '11 at 22:30

Since PHP doesn't have enums your way to do it is perfectly fine.

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