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I have following code

for (var i = 0; i < that.$el.mini.length; i++) {
            var pag = that.$el.mini[i].pagination;
            // Mini-Slider Pagination
            $('li', pag).each( function(j, el) {
                $(el).click( function() {
                    /*
                     * Toggle Mini-Slide
                     */
                    that.slider_fn.mini.show(i, j);
                    return false;
                });
            });
        }

So, basically, what I want to do is run this function that.slider_fn.mini.show(i, j); when the element is clicked.

The problem is that I want to use the variable i, which changes its value in the loop. When the element is clicked, i is valued as the latest number, that is that.$el.mini.length.

How can I make JavaScript (or a function) to memorize that particular number?

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4 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Use a closure to close over the value of i:

$(el).click( (function(i_){
  return function() {
     that.slider_fn.mini.show(i_, j);
     return false;
  };
})(i));

Beforehand, your function was referencing the variable called i, now on each iteration you create a new function that references i_, and this variable is unique to each function and references the value of i when the function was created.

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Thanks. I already know that something related to functions should be implemented, but forgot about closures –  Omar Abid May 16 '11 at 22:30
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You need to create a function closure and pass in the variables that you want to persist as arguments as follows:

for (var i = 0; i < that.$el.mini.length; i++) {
    var pag = that.$el.mini[i].pagination;
    $('li', pag).each(function (j, el) {

        // function closure to persist i, j, and el
        (function (idx, jdx, elem) {
            $(elem).click(function () {
                that.slider_fn.mini.show(idx, jdx);
                return false;
            });
        } (i, j, el));

    });
}
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The closure answers given are the conventional way to solve your problem, but if you don't care for the self-invoking anonymous functions, you might consider using forEach():

that.$el.mini.forEach(function (element,i){
            var pag = element.pagination;
            // Mini-Slider Pagination
            $('li', pag).each( function(j, el) {
                $(el).click( function() {
                    /*
                     * Toggle Mini-Slide
                     */
                    that.slider_fn.mini.show(i, j);
                    return false;
                });
            });
        }) ;

Caveat: forEach() is not implemented in all browsers. You can see how to shim it, as described under 'Compatibility' at https://developer.mozilla.org/en/JavaScript/Reference/global_objects/array/foreach

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This is assuming that pag is an element, and that you are using jquery.

for (var i = 0; i < that.$el.mini.length; i++) {

var pag = that.$el.mini[i].pagination;

// Mini-Slider Pagination
$('li', pag).each( function(j, el) {

    $(el).data('page-index', i); // add data to the element being clicked
    $(el).click( function() {

        /*
         * Toggle Mini-Slide
         */
        that.slider_fn.mini.show($(this).data('page-index'), j);

        return false;
    });
});

}

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or you could do the closure as well, but i think this is cleaner. –  ansiart May 16 '11 at 22:15
    
Cleaner, in which perspective? The data function adds lot of information to the HTML page. I have lot of UL and LI. –  Omar Abid May 16 '11 at 22:30
    
Well cleaner as the data is stored with the element, rather than creating an entirely new anonymous function closure every time you want to associate data with an object. This doesn't add specific information to the element, but is stored a jquery object hash. –  ansiart May 17 '11 at 2:19
    
But you are going to create the function anyway? –  Omar Abid May 17 '11 at 21:42
    
Well it's all a matter of opinion honestly. If you think creating an a function that returns an anonymous function is cleaner fine -- personally I think it's harder to read. Also harder to debug, as state of the variable i is within another state. But seriously, it's so small, that either way .... –  ansiart May 18 '11 at 17:19
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