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I have a folder that contains versions of my application, each time I upload a new version a new sub-folder is created for it, the sub-folder name is the current timestamp, here is a printout of the main folder used (ls -l |grep ^d):

drwxrwxr-x 7 root root 4096 2011-03-31 16:18 20110331161649
drwxrwxr-x 7 root root 4096 2011-03-31 16:21 20110331161914
drwxrwxr-x 7 root root 4096 2011-03-31 16:53 20110331165035
drwxrwxr-x 7 root root 4096 2011-03-31 16:59 20110331165712
drwxrwxr-x 7 root root 4096 2011-04-03 20:18 20110403201607
drwxrwxr-x 7 root root 4096 2011-04-03 20:38 20110403203613
drwxrwxr-x 7 root root 4096 2011-04-04 14:39 20110405143725
drwxrwxr-x 7 root root 4096 2011-04-06 15:24 20110406151805
drwxrwxr-x 7 root root 4096 2011-04-06 15:36 20110406153157
drwxrwxr-x 7 root root 4096 2011-04-06 16:02 20110406155913
drwxrwxr-x 7 root root 4096 2011-04-10 21:10 20110410210928
drwxrwxr-x 7 root root 4096 2011-04-10 21:50 20110410214939
drwxrwxr-x 7 root root 4096 2011-04-10 22:15 20110410221414
drwxrwxr-x 7 root root 4096 2011-04-11 22:19 20110411221810
drwxrwxr-x 7 root root 4096 2011-05-01 21:30 20110501212953
drwxrwxr-x 7 root root 4096 2011-05-01 23:02 20110501230121
drwxrwxr-x 7 root root 4096 2011-05-03 21:57 20110503215252
drwxrwxr-x 7 root root 4096 2011-05-06 16:17 20110506161546
drwxrwxr-x 7 root root 4096 2011-05-11 10:00 20110511095709
drwxrwxr-x 7 root root 4096 2011-05-11 10:13 20110511100938
drwxrwxr-x 7 root root 4096 2011-05-12 14:34 20110512143143
drwxrwxr-x 7 root root 4096 2011-05-13 22:13 20110513220824
drwxrwxr-x 7 root root 4096 2011-05-14 22:26 20110514222548
drwxrwxr-x 7 root root 4096 2011-05-14 23:03 20110514230258

I'm looking for a command that will leave the last 10 versions (sub-folders) and deletes the rest.

Any thoughts?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 14 down vote accepted

There you go. (edited)

ls -dt */ | tail -n +11 | xargs rm -rf

First list directories recently modified then take all of them except first 10, then send them to rm -rf.

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im getting: rm: cannot remove directory: `.' –  Ran May 16 '11 at 22:27
3  
Whoa! First, ls -dt only ever outputs .. Second, if you correct that to ls -t, you are deleting the 10 newest files, exactly the opposite of what was asked. Third, if there are files other than the directories considered, your script will happily delete random stuff. Fourth, if there are “strange” file names, your script could do anything, because you're parsing the output of ls, not a good idea, and you're passing unprepared input to xargs. –  Gilles May 16 '11 at 22:30
    
wait a sec I have noticed that you want to leave first 10 and remove all others, I thought that you need to remove first 10. hmm your error is interesting. –  ahmet alp balkan May 16 '11 at 22:31
    
i want to keep the latest 10. –  Ran May 16 '11 at 22:33
    
Fixed. Grep and sed will slow down, ls -d will be faster. (when compared to other solutions). And tail +10 will delete 10th record, too. therefore tail +11 is better. –  ahmet alp balkan May 16 '11 at 22:35
ls -dt1 /path/to/folder/*/ | sed '11,$p' | rm -r 

this assumes those are the only directories and no others are present in the working directory.

  • ls -dt1 will normally only print the newest directory however the /*/ will only match directories and print their full paths the 1 ensures one line per match/listing t sorts time with newest at the top.

  • sed takes the 11th line on down to the bottom and prints only those lines, which are then passed to rm.

You can use xargs, but for testing you may wish to remove | rm -r to see if the directories are listed properly first.

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ls -lt | grep ^d | sed -e '1,10d' |  awk '{sub(/.* /, ""); print }' | xargs rm -rf 

Explanation:

  • list all contents of current directory in chronological order (most recent files first)
  • filter out all the directories
  • ignore the 10 first lines / directories
  • use awk to extract the file names from the remaining 'ls -l' output

  • remove the files

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If the directories' names contain the date one can delete all but the last 10 directories with the default alphabetical sort

ls -d */ | head -n -10  | xargs rm -rf
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EDIT:

find . -maxdepth 1 -type d ! -name \\.| sort | tac | sed -e '1,10d' | xargs rm -rf
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i think it should be: ls -l| grep ^d | tac | sed -e '1,10d' | xargs rm -rf –  Ran May 16 '11 at 22:30
    
You're parsing the output of ls, not a good idea, and you're passing unprepared input to xargs. Your grep ^d isn't doing what you think it's doing — if you had ls -l, you'd need to extract file names (not a good idea), but since you don't, there's no directory indicator. –  Gilles May 16 '11 at 22:33
    
yeah, that was junk. my bad. –  linuts May 16 '11 at 23:05

Your directory names are sorted in chronological order, which makes this easy. The list of directories in chronological order is just *, or [0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9] to be more precise. So you want to delete all but the last 10 of them.

set [0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9]/
while [ $# -gt 10 ]; do
  rm -rf "$1"
  shift
fi

(While there are more than 10 directories left, delete the oldest one.)

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