Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

So I'd like to have a gradient that fills 100% of the background of a webpage. For browsers that can't handle it, a solid color is fine.

here is my current css:

html {
height: 100%;
}
body {
height: 100%;
margin: 0;
padding: 0;
background-repeat: no-repeat;
background: #afb1b4; /* Old browsers */
background: -moz-linear-gradient(top, #afb1b4 0%, #696a6d 100%) no-repeat; /* FF3.6+ */
background: -webkit-gradient(linear, left top, left bottom, color-stop(0%,#afb1b4), color-stop(100%,#696a6d)); /* Chrome,Safari4+ */
background: -webkit-linear-gradient(top, #afb1b4 0%,#696a6d 100%); /* Chrome10+,Safari5.1+ */
background: -o-linear-gradient(top, #afb1b4 0%,#696a6d 100%); /* Opera11.10+ */
background: -ms-linear-gradient(top, #afb1b4 0%,#696a6d 100%); /* IE10+ */
filter: progid:DXImageTransform.Microsoft.gradient( startColorstr='#AFB1B4', endColorstr='#696A6D',GradientType=0 ); /* IE6-9 */
background: linear-gradient(top, #afb1b4 0%,#696a6d 100%); /* W3C */
}

It seemed to work out while the page had little content, but as I've filled out the page with more content, navigation, etcetera, there is now some white at the bottom. maybe 100px or so. Am I doing this wrong? Do I need to be offsetting some padding somewhere?

share|improve this question
    
looks like you got this from here: colorzilla.com/gradient-editor –  Jason May 16 '11 at 23:35
    
@Jason, I did, it's pretty thoroughly cross-browser, which I like. However, I've yet to test non-FF browsers. That bit comes soon. –  Unfortunately May 17 '11 at 0:08
    
i use it a lot. it is very cross-browser and works really well. –  Jason May 17 '11 at 0:16
    
If you don't care about backwards compatability (fallback to flat color), why not get rid of 6 lines of code and use an SVG gradient via background-image: url()? It works in IE9+, FF4, Webkit since forever, and Opera 10. –  Kevin Peno May 17 '11 at 17:14
    
Because an extra few lines of code gets me a whole lot of the older browsers. I wont worry about ancient browsers, but if I can have it work in the majority of browsers, that's definitely my preference. –  Unfortunately May 17 '11 at 17:38

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Get rid of your height: 100% declarations. It seems like setting the height to 100% just sets it to 100% of the viewport, not actually 100% of the page itself.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, this did it! The code below, even with the height: 100% thrown in there, worked as well. Removing the height does seem like the right way to do it, though. –  Unfortunately May 17 '11 at 10:43
    
@Jason : What happened to the fiddle? –  Roko C. Buljan Dec 18 '11 at 13:34
    
hrm. dunno... weird! –  Jason Dec 19 '11 at 3:38
    
fiddle link broken :( –  sirLisko Jan 30 '13 at 18:56

Here's an expansion of my comment to use SVG instead of vendor prefix and proprietary extensions. This reduces the size of the CSS and, with the employment of some ingenius tactics, can allow you to use a single SVG file as a sprite pack for gradients (reducing the total number of HTTP requests).

First create your SVG file and gradient (per your question specs):

<?xml version="1.0" standalone="no"?>
<!DOCTYPE svg PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD SVG 1.1//EN" "http://www.w3.org/Graphics/SVG/1.1/DTD/svg11.dtd">
<svg width="1" height="500" version="1.1" xmlns="http://www.w3.org/2000/svg">
    <g>
        <defs>
            <linearGradient id="ui-bg-grad" x1="0%" x2="0%" y1="0%" y2="100%">
                <stop offset="0%" stop-color="#afb1b4" />
                <stop offset="100%" stop-color="#696a6d" />
            </linearGradient>
        </defs>
        <rect fill="url(#ui-bg-grad)" x="0" y="0" width="100%" height="500"/>
    </g>
</svg>

Next, here's your new declaration:

html {
    height: 100%;
}
body {
    height: 100%;
    margin: 0;
    padding: 0;
    background-repeat: no-repeat;
    background-color: #afb1b4; /* Old browsers: anything not listed below */
    background-image: url("grad.svg"); /** Browsers that support SVG: IE9+, FF4+, Safari 4+(maybe 5), Opera 10+
}

Now, if you want to support older browsers with png image, you can with one little change. Since any property that uses url() does not support hinting (like @font-face's src property), you have to alter the rule a little.

html {
    height: 100%;
}
body {
    height: 100%;
    margin: 0;
    padding: 0;
    background-repeat: no-repeat;
    background-color: #afb1b4; /* Image fails to load, or FF3.5 */
    background-image: url("grad.png"); /* Old browsers: anything not listed below or above */
}

body:not(foo) { /* most browsers that support :not() support SVG in url(), except FF3.5 */
    background-image: url("grad.svg"); /* Browsers that support SVG: IE9+, FF4+, Safari 4+(maybe 5), Opera 10+ */
}

If you want to get stupid crazy, you could base64encode the SVG file so that you don't have to download another file from the server then add it as a class to be reused (prevent repasting the base64 in multiple place).

.svg-sprite:not(foo)
{
    background-size: 100% 100%;
    background-image: url("data:image/svg+xml;base64,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");
}

html {
    height: 100%;
}

body {
    height: 100%;
    margin: 0;
    padding: 0;
    background-repeat: no-repeat;
    background-color: #afb1b4; /* Image fails to load, or FF3.5 */
    background-image: url("grad.png"); /* Old browsers: anything not listed below or above */
}

Then update your body tag to include the .svg-sprite class.

share|improve this answer
1  
I'd vote this up if I had 15 reputation. Fantastic, thorough answer. Much appreciated! –  Unfortunately May 18 '11 at 4:07
    
@Unfortunately, np. I just have an issue with the fact that a perfectly portable, and stable, spec is not seeing as much influence as css gradients (which is still very much in dev). –  Kevin Peno May 18 '11 at 15:44

I also found that adding 'fixed' to the end seemed to do the trick:

body {
margin: 0;
padding: 0;
background-repeat: no-repeat;
background: #afb1b4; /* Old browsers */
background: -moz-linear-gradient(top, #afb1b4 0%, #696a6d 100%) fixed no-repeat; /* FF3.6+ */
background: -webkit-gradient(linear, left top, left bottom, color-stop(0%,#afb1b4), color-stop(100%,#696a6d)) fixed; /* Chrome,Safari4+ */
background: -webkit-linear-gradient(top, #afb1b4 0%,#696a6d 100%) fixed; /* Chrome10+,Safari5.1+ */
background: -o-linear-gradient(top, #afb1b4 0%,#696a6d 100%) fixed; /* Opera11.10+ */
background: -ms-linear-gradient(top, #afb1b4 0%,#696a6d 100%) fixed; /* IE10+ */
filter: progid:DXImageTransform.Microsoft.gradient( startColorstr='#AFB1B4', endColorstr='#696A6D',GradientType=0 ); /* IE6-9 */
background: linear-gradient(top, #afb1b4 0%,#696a6d 100%) fixed; /* W3C */
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Note that this will drastically reduce performance on even the newer browsers! –  Anonymous Jan 9 '12 at 13:38
    
Good to know! Is an image really the better way to do this? –  Unfortunately Feb 7 '12 at 18:59
    
Depends on what you call better...as I see the perfomance-issue (it surely must be a bug) a big deal, I would say so, yes! If it wasn't for that, the css3 method would defenitely be better. –  Anonymous Feb 7 '12 at 21:52

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.