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Heres the scenario: I have a User object like this:

 public class User : BaseEntity<User>, IAggregateRoot
 {
    public virtual string Name { get; set; }
    public virtual string Username { get; set; }
    public virtual string Password { get; set; }
    public virtual string SecretQuestion { get; set; }
    public virtual string SecretAnswer { get; set; }
    public virtual DateTime LastLogin { get; set; }
 }

During the editing of this object, i load it into the view, but i only want to update some of the properties (ie i wouldnt want to update LastLogin property). In this situation what would i do?

Is the best strategy to create a user viewmodel, and will nhibernate cope with this when i try to update a user object with a null LastLogin field?

Thanks in advance.

EDIT

Something like this:

public class UserViewModel
{
  public string Name {get;set;}
  public string UserName {get;set;}
  public string Password {get;set;}
  public string SecretQuestion {get;set;}
  public string SecretAnswer {get;set;}
}

And then the editing:

public ActionResult Edit(int id)
{
  return View(_userRepository.FindById(id));
}

[HttpPost]
public ActionResult Edit(int id, UserViewModel userViewModel)
{
  try
  {

    //Not sure how to update the model 
    //with the view Model and save.

    _userRepository.Update(????);
    return RedirectToAction("Index");
  }
  catch
  {
    return View();
  }
}
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3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

A good approach is to create a UserViewModel with only the properties you want to display/update. Don't let nHibernate know about the view model. Then, when the edits are posted back to your controller you retrieve the actual User object from nHibernate, update it's properties from the view model, and then save it back to the database.

Update

Something like this:

[HttpPost]
public ActionResult Edit(int id, UserViewModel userViewModel)
{
  try
  {
    User model = _userRepository.FindById(id);

    model.Name = userViewModel.Name;
    model.Username = userViewModel.Username;
    model.Password = userViewModel.Password;
    model.SecretQuestion = userViewModel.SecretQuestion;
    model.SecretAnswer = userViewModel.SecretAnswer;

    _userRepository.Update(model);
    return RedirectToAction("Index");
  }
  catch
  {
    return View();
  }
}

In a project I've been working on recently I created a ViewModelBase class which includes methods that maps properties from a domain model to a view model and back again based on matching the property name and type. All my view models are derived from ViewModelBase.

There are other tools like AutoMapper that do this sort of thing and much, much more.

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Hi andrew thanks for your reply. Can you post as example of the viewmodel and an edit post using my class above? Its the edit bit i am unsure about. –  gdp May 17 '11 at 21:48

I'm adding another answer, because there is another, completely different, approach.

You can just use your User object in your view, and then use TryUpdateModel to specify the properties to update in the model. You don't necessarily need a view model in this case. You can use one if you want, but you don't have to.

The Post action would then look something like:

[HttpPost]
public ActionResult Edit(int id)
{
  try
  {
    User model = _userRepository.FindById(id);
    var propertiesToUpdate = new string[] { "Name", 
                                            "Username", 
                                            "Password", 
                                            "SecretQuestion", 
                                            "SecretAnswer" };

    if (TryUpdateModel(model, propertiesToUpdate)) {
      _userRepository.Update(model);
      return RedirectToAction("Index");
    }
  }
  catch
  {
    // Handle exceptions however you want.
  }
  return View();
}

The string array is a white-list of properties to update in the model, and the controller attempts to update the values from the form post data (and other sources). Because LastLogin is not in the string array, it won't be touched in the update of the model.

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Great stuff thanks for your input! –  gdp May 18 '11 at 18:17
    
Hi Andrew, i got both working fine. Just curious which method would you favour and why? –  gdp May 19 '11 at 23:19
    
For an application with simple domain models I'd probably choose the method in this answer because creating a bunch of new view model classes and the associated mapping logic would just be overkill. When the domain model is more complex, and your views pull values from more than one domain object class I'd go with the ViewModel solution. In the system I was building at work recently I started out without ViewModels, but it very quickly became too complex to manage cleanly. I ended up implementing ViewModels for most of the views, resulting in many more classes, but much more readable code. –  Andrew Cooper May 19 '11 at 23:43
    
Thanks for your input. –  gdp May 20 '11 at 22:19
    
This explicit listing of properties-of-interest, inside the controller action, makes for some easy-to-read code. Nice. –  bkwdesign Oct 11 '13 at 18:03

I am working on a technique where I create a custom derivative of the DefaultModelBinder. It kinda works along the same lines as the white-list approach posted by @AndrewCooper, but, with a twist.

In my approach, I stick with one big honking ViewModel that can have myriad partial Views attempting to update it. The white-list, in my case, are the critical object identity fields needed to inform the ViewModel how it can auto-load itself from the repository - so, it's expected that the Partial views ONLY contain the fields they care about, and, enough hidden fields to flesh out object identity if it isn't immediately apparent from the route or whatever.

Thus, during the POST 'model binding' phase, identity fields are bound first (thus, a 'load' is triggered to immediately flesh the model from the DB) and as the remainder of the binding process completes, you have effectively 'merged' the object pulled from the DB with the user-submitted data.. and on top of that (assuming you've stuck with MVC conventions) it has now been through validation.

This allows me to stick with a textbook simple controller method.. something like..

  Public Function Edit(id As Integer, workOrder as MergedWorkOrderModel) As ActionResult
    If ModelState.IsValid Then
        /* save model, send success messaging into ViewBag, etc */
        workOrder.Save("ServiceUrl")
        workOrder.Load("ServiceUrl")
        ViewBag.SuccessMessage = String.Format("Order {0} saved successfully!", workOrder.Id)
        Return View(workOrder)
    Else
        /* return user model to fix errors */
        ViewBag.ErrorMessage = String.Format("Order {0} did not save.", workOrder.Id)
        Return View(workOrder)
    End If
  End Function

Theoretically, I could point all my varying views back to this same method - because it cares not where the user data came from.. it all gets merged with the lastest from the DB, validated, and saved all the same.

More info at my StackOverflow post

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