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I have a set of data in which I need to code values of certain variables (numeric) into 3 classes.

My data set is similar to this but has 60 more variables:

anim <- c(1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13,14,15)
wt <- c(181,179,180.5,201,201.5,245,246.4,189.3,301,354,369,205,199,394,231.3)
data <- data.frame(anim,wt)

> data
   anim    wt
1     1 181.0
2     2 179.0
3     3 180.5
4     4 201.0
5     5 201.5
6     6 245.0
7     7 246.4
8     8 189.3
9     9 301.0
10   10 354.0
11   11 369.0
12   12 205.0
13   13 199.0
14   14 394.0
15   15 231.3

I need to code values of the variable "wt" up into 3 classes: (wt >= 179 & wt < 200) = 1; (wt >= 200 & wt < 300) = 2; (wt > 300) = 3

which should give me this

> data2
   anim    wt SWT
1     1 181.0   1
2     2 179.0   1
3     3 180.5   1
4     4 201.0   2
5     5 201.5   2
6     6 245.0   2
7     7 246.4   2
8     8 189.3   1
9     9 301.0   3
10   10 354.0   3
11   11 369.0   3
12   12 205.0   2
13   13 199.0   1
14   14 394.0   3
15   15 231.3   2
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5 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The cut method as outlined by @Greg is probably what you want here. One thing to note is that cut returns a factor by default, which you can suppress by supplying labels = FALSE to return the integer values:

cut(data$wt, c(178, 200, 300, Inf), labels = FALSE)

Alternatively, if your cutting does not lend itself to natural breaks, you can use ifelse(). You can "nest" the ifelse statements similar to Excel. I use "with" to cut down on the typing needed:

data$group2 <- with(data, ifelse(wt >= 179 & wt < 200, 1, 
  ifelse(wt >= 200 & wt < 300, 2, 3))
)
share|improve this answer
    
good point on the labels. I usually just cast it to a numeric with as.numeric to get integer group values. –  Greg May 17 '11 at 0:24
    
@Greg - I imagine it's six in one, 1/2 dozen in the other. I actually didn't realize cut would return the numeric values until looking at the help file for the question. I've always used the as.numeric() method as well... –  Chase May 17 '11 at 0:26
1  
@baz - I find ifelse more useful when I am computing a new variables based off of 2 or more existing variables...i.e if "Monday and rainy" then "don't get out of bed" –  Chase May 17 '11 at 0:47
2  
@baz, @Chase - nested ifelse statements are great for 3 groups. but if you have 20 groups, it can get unwieldy. –  Greg May 17 '11 at 1:02
1  
@baz : for performance, you better don't nest too many ifelses. Cut is designed to do this for you, so use it. –  Joris Meys May 17 '11 at 8:29
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You can try cut

anim <- c(1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13,14,15) 
wt <-c(181,179,180.5,201,201.5,245,246.4,
189.3,301,354,369,205,199,394,231.3) 
data <- data.frame(anim,wt)

EDIT: fixed group - right = FALSE, got rid of split example.

group = cut(data$wt, c(178, 200, 300, Inf), right=FALSE)


data$swt = as.numeric(group)
data
   anim    wt swt
1     1 181.0   1
2     2 179.0   1
3     3 180.5   1
4     4 201.0   2
5     5 201.5   2
6     6 245.0   2
7     7 246.4   2
8     8 189.3   1
9     9 301.0   3
10   10 354.0   3
11   11 369.0   3
12   12 205.0   2
13   13 199.0   1
14   14 394.0   3
15   15 231.3   2
> 
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I believe that I should have used the term "coding" instead of "breaking", which means that I need to code wt=179<200 as 1; wt=200<300 as 2 and wt>300 as 3. sorry for my mistake! –  baz May 17 '11 at 0:15
1  
@baz - I added code to add the group. You can look at the right parameter to include either the left or right side of the interval. I think my left/right parameter is off from your example. –  Greg May 17 '11 at 0:18
    
@baz - I think my data frame matches yours now. –  Greg May 17 '11 at 0:20
1  
I imagine labels = FALSE is preferred over as.numeric() for those that get worked up over such things. –  Chase May 17 '11 at 0:23
    
what if i need to split up my wt variable into 3 equal sized groups or any continuous variable for that matter –  baz May 24 '11 at 0:32
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I think Greg's answers cover "standard operating procedure", but I find many uses for the findInterval function as well. It naturally returns a number that identifies the interval in the second argument.

 data$int <- findInterval(data$wt, c(179, 200, 300, Inf))
 data
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Just to show an alternate (similar to recode in SPSS) method from package car:

> data$SWT <- with(data, recode(wt, "lo:200=1; 300:hi=3; else=2"))
> data
   anim    wt SWT
1     1 181.0   1
2     2 179.0   1
3     3 180.5   1
4     4 201.0   2
5     5 201.5   2
6     6 245.0   2
7     7 246.4   2
8     8 189.3   1
9     9 301.0   3
10   10 354.0   3
11   11 369.0   3
12   12 205.0   2
13   13 199.0   1
14   14 394.0   3
15   15 231.3   2
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I also use the package car in some of my recoding work on categorical variables like: df$newvar <- recode(df$oldvar,"c(1)=2;c(0)=1") but has never used it on continuous varibales. Thanks for that! –  baz May 17 '11 at 23:15
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Just for completeness and info, the classInt package (on CRAN) is another handy way to classify numbers into classes.

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