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Is where a way to persist objects over re-execs of a running script? If I want a running script to re execute itself to pick up any code changes, (os.exec*) is there a way to persist the objects for access after the re-execution? I could set environment variables with pickled ascii data, or write that data to a pipe and re-read it after the re-execution, but that seems inelegant or like a hack. Even if doing that, not all items pickle well.

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What do you mean by 're-excution'? Your script being terminated and run again by the user in the same session? Or your script calling itself using os.exec()? –  Boaz Yaniv May 17 '11 at 0:08
    
@boaz the script calling itself with os.exec –  tMC May 17 '11 at 0:21
    
Then this seems like a bad idea to me, unless you want to run multiple processes in parallel (but then you wouldn't want persistence). Python has so many facilities for running python code, that you shouldn't need to use os.exec() for python script. Have you looked at Greg's solution? –  Boaz Yaniv May 17 '11 at 0:58
    
Gregs solution is how im planning to implement right now. This process will be the init process on an embedded linux system, so the only other option for re-reading the init code, is a reboot. Which isn't unacceptable, as code changes shouldn't be changing with init after development. I was just trying to emulate sysvinit –  tMC May 17 '11 at 1:00

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you put your code in a module, you can use the reload() standard function to load the new version of the code. Your main module could look like this:

import mymodule

while mymodule.go():
    reload(mymodule)

Whenever you want to reload your module code, return True from go(). When you want to exit, return False.

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Check out shelve.

import shelve

db = shelve.open("database", "c")
db["one"] = 1
db["two"] = 2
db["three"] = 3
db.close()
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if i can get away with it, i'd like to not worry about what objects im trying to save and if they will pickle as expected. –  tMC May 17 '11 at 0:11

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