Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

What is the difference between these two?

collapse: function(fold)
{
...
...
}

and

function collapse(fold)
{
...
...
}
share|improve this question
    
Let me rephrase: what is the difference between these? –  sapiensgladio May 17 '11 at 0:21
    
1. the semi-colon, 2. the words are swapped :) –  Šime Vidas May 17 '11 at 0:22

5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The first one outside of the context of an object literal is a syntax error.

However, I believe you are asking about the difference between a function expression and a function declaration.

Your first one is a function expression. You assign an anonymous function to a variable. Its variable definition is hoisted to the top of its scope, but not the assignment of the function.

The second is the function declaration. Its entire body is hoisted to the top of the scope.

In general, a function expression is often used as it is more expressive. You can give it a name if you need to call it recursively (or for better detailed stack traces), but remember IE leaks this name to the outer scope.

Further Reading.

share|improve this answer

The first code is only valid to produce a property inside an object definition, like so:

var obj = {
    collapse: function(fold)
    {
    ...
    ...
    }
};

That function would be called by calling obj.collapse(fold);

The second function is simply called using collapse(fold);

As for the difference between var name = function() { ... } and function name() { ... } see: Javascript: var functionName = function() {} vs function functionName() {}

share|improve this answer

The first syntax declares a method on an object. The second declares a regular function.

share|improve this answer
1  
Not necessarily global, unless it's in the global namespace... –  NickC May 17 '11 at 0:23
    
Not necessarily global. It could be nested inside another function. –  Šime Vidas May 17 '11 at 0:24
    
Point taken. answer corrected. –  Andrew Cooper May 17 '11 at 0:28

The first one is not valid JavaScript, I'll assume that you meant =, not :. This is the same in global scope, first one uses an anonymous function and the second is just some syntactic sugar to name a function. The difference would be that in non global scope first one would produce a function in global scope, the second would be created in most recent scope (for the same effect use var x = function() {} in the first example).

share|improve this answer
    
Its actually valid, you end up with an hash with functions imbedded into it, not quite a class, not quite functional land, very common when defining callbacks as part of a configuration.. –  Stephen May 17 '11 at 0:35

The first one is creating a property called "collapse" on whatever the current object is (or if there is no current object, then it will error out) and assigning a function to it. The function will only be accessible through its associated object, by calling something along the lines of obj.collapse();.

The second one is creating a function called "collapse" in the global namespace (i.e. as a property on window). The function can be called from anywhere by doing collapse();.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.