Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How would one go about securing the below DOM Based XSS attack?

Specifically, is there a protect() function that will make the below safe? If no, then is there another solution? eg: Giving the div an id and then later assigning the element an onclick handler

<?php
function protect()
{
   // For non-DOM XSS attacks, hex-encoding all non-alphanumeric characters
   // with ASCII values less than 256 works (ie: \xHH)
   // But is it possible to augment this function to protect against
   // the below DOM based XSS attack?
}
?>

<body>
  <div id="mydiv"></div>
  <script type="text/javascript">
    var xss = "<?php echo protect($_GET["xss"]) ?>";
    $("#mydiv").html("<div onclick='myfunc(\""+xss+"\")'></div>")
  </script>
</body>

I'm hoping for an answer that is not "avoid using innerHTML" or "regex the xss variable to [a-zA-Z0-9]"...ie: is there a more general solution?

Thanks

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

Expanding on Vineet's reply, here's a set of test-cases to look into:

http://ha.ckers.org/xss.html

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks fore responding - yes, I'm very well aware of this resource. My question is not about how to attack the above scenario -- but rather on how to defend the above scenario. –  user324289 May 17 '11 at 13:38

I've been playing around with PHP's DOMDocument and related classes with a view to writing a HTML parser that can deal with stuff like this. It's at a very early stage of development at the moment and is nowhere near ready for actual use, but my early experiments seem to show some promise for the idea.

Basically, you load your Markup into a DOMDocument, then traverse the tree. For each node in the tree you check what the node type is against a list of allowed node types. If the node type isn't in the list then it's removed from the tree.

You could use an approach similar to this to locate all SCRIPT tags in a piece of markup and remove them. DOM based XSS is rendered toothless if you can pull any embedded scripts out of the markup you've been provided.

This is the code I'm using, along with a test case that processes the StackOverflow home page. Like I said, it's far from production quality code and is little more than a proof of concept. Still, I hope you find it useful.

<?php
class HtmlClean
{
    private $whiteList      = array (
        '#cdata-section', '#comment', '#text', 'a', 'abbr', 'acronym', 'address', 'b', 
        'big', 'blockquote', 'body', 'br', 'caption', 'cite', 'code', 'col', 'colgroup', 
        'dd', 'del', 'dfn', 'div', 'dl', 'dt', 'em', 'fieldset', 'h1', 'h2', 'h3', 'h4', 
        'h5', 'h6', 'head', 'hr', 'html', 'i', 'img', 'ins', 'kbd', 'li', 'link', 'meta', 
        'ol', 'p', 'pre', 'q', 'samp', 'small', 'span', 'strike', 'strong', 'style', 'sub', 
        'sup', 'table', 'tbody', 'td', 'tfoot', 'th', 'thead', 'title', 'tr', 'tt', 'ul', 
        'var'
    );

    private $attrWhiteList  = array (
        'class', 'id', 'title'
    );

    private $dom            = NULL;

    /**
     * Get current tag whitelist
     * @return array
     */
    public function getWhiteListTags ()
    {
        $this -> whiteList  = array_values ($this -> whiteList);
        return ($this -> whiteList);
    }

    /**
     * Add tag to the whitelist
     * @param string $tagName
     */
    public function addWhiteListTag ($tagName)
    {
        $tagName    = strtolower (trin ($tagName));
        if (!in_array ($tagName, $this -> whiteList))
        {
            $this -> whiteList []   = $tagName;
        }
    }

    /**
     * Remove a tag from the whitelist
     * @param string $tagName
     */
    public function removeWhiteListTag ($tagName)
    {
        if ($index = array_search ($tagName, $this -> whiteList))
        {
            unset ($this -> whiteList [$index]);
        }
    }

    /**
     * Load document markup into the class for cleaning
     * @param string $html The markup to clean
     * @return bool
     */
    public function loadHTML ($html)
    {
        if (!$this -> dom)
        {
            $this -> dom    = new DOMDocument();
        }
        $this -> dom -> preserveWhiteSpace  = false;
        $this -> dom -> formatOutput        = true;
        return $this -> dom -> loadHTML ($html);
    }

    public function outputHtml ()
    {
        $ret    = '';
        if ($this -> dom)
        {
            $ret    = $this -> dom -> saveXML ();
        }
        return ($ret);
    }

    private function cleanAttrs (DOMnode $elem)
    {
        $attrs  = $elem -> attributes;
        $index  = $attrs -> length;
        while (--$index >= 0)
        {
            $attrName   = strtolower ($attrs -> item ($indes) -> name);
            if (!in_array ($attrName, $this -> attrWhiteList))
            {
                $elem -> removeAttribute ($attrName);
            }
        }       
    }

    /**
     * Recursivly remove elements from the DOM that aren't whitelisted
     * @param DOMNode $elem
     * @return array List of elements removed from the DOM
     * @throws Exception If removal of a node failed than an exception is thrown
     */
    private function cleanNodes (DOMNode $elem)
    {
        $removed    = array ();
        if (in_array (strtolower ($elem -> nodeName), $this -> whiteList))
        {
            // Remove non-whitelisted attributes
            if ($elem -> hasAttributes ())
            {
                $this -> cleanAttrs ($elem);
            }
            /*
             * Iterate over the element's children. The reason we go backwards is because
             * going forwards will cause indexes to change when elements get removed
             */
            if ($elem -> hasChildNodes ())
            {
                $children   = $elem -> childNodes;
                $index      = $children -> length;
                while (--$index >= 0)
                {
                    $removed = array_merge ($removed, $this -> cleanNodes ($children -> item ($index)));
                }
            }
        }
        else
        {
            // The element is not on the whitelist, so remove it
            if ($elem -> parentNode -> removeChild ($elem))
            {
                $removed [] = $elem;
            }
            else
            {
                throw new Exception ('Failed to remove node from DOM');
            }
        }
        return ($removed);
    }

    /**
     * Perform the cleaning of the document
     */
    public function clean ()
    {
        $removed    = $this -> cleanNodes ($this -> dom -> getElementsByTagName ('html') -> item (0));
        return ($removed);
    }
}

$test       = file_get_contents( ('http://www.stackoverflow.com/'));
// Windows-stype linebreaks really foul up the works. There's probably a better fix for this
$test       = str_replace (chr (13), '', $test);

$cleaner    = new HtmlClean ();
$cleaner -> loadHTML ($test);

echo ('<h1>Before</h1><pre>' . htmlspecialchars ($cleaner -> outputHtml ()) . '</pre>');

$start      = microtime (true);
$removed    = $cleaner -> clean ();
$cleanTime  = microtime (true) - $start;

echo ('<h1>Removed tag list</h1>');
foreach ($removed as $elem)
{
    var_dump ($elem -> nodeName);
}

echo ('<h1>After</h1><pre>' . htmlspecialchars ($cleaner -> outputHtml ()) . '</pre>');

// benchmark
var_dump ($cleanTime);
?>
share|improve this answer

I'm no PHP expert, but if you want to prevent XSS attacks against the code sample presented, in the current format, with minimum changes, you could use the PHP edition of OWASP ESAPI. To be specific, use the JavaScript codec class from ESAPI to protect the contents of the xss variable, as it appears in a JavaScript context.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the response. I tried that library and it brought my application to it's knees. That library is thorough, but can't be used in a production environment as it is as slow as molasses. Further, it doesn't address the above scenario. It provides javascript, html, and url encoding functions but doesn't really tell you how to use them. I've read their DOM BASED XSS FAQ and it doesn't clearly address the above situation -- at least it certainly isn't clear to me. –  user324289 May 17 '11 at 2:30
    
Well, tough luck. My experience with the Java version was much better. Can't vouch for the PHP one though. –  Vineet Reynolds May 17 '11 at 2:32
    
Btw, this is not a case of DOM based XSS. You will find the instructions in the XSS prevention cheat sheet on JavaScript escaping to be more pertinent. As far as the performance issues of ESAPI are concerned, I believe that might be attributed less to the encoding routine, for a well optimized encoding routine will slow down the application by about 1-5%. You might want to refactor the ESAPI code to suit your needs. –  Vineet Reynolds May 17 '11 at 2:49
    
Have you looked at the ESAPI code? It's absolutely bloatware and frankly is horrific - there's no way to easily 'optimize' it. Regarding the XSS prevention cheat sheet -- yes I've read it 3 times over as well as the DOM Based XSS FAQ and it doesn't seem to directly address my question. Lastly, it is a DOM Based XSS case since it's using innerHTML. –  user324289 May 17 '11 at 13:37
    
Like I said before, I'm no PHP expert, so if you can rewrite it better, you may proceed to do so. I haven't found any issues with the Java version of it, and my load tests demonstrate a barely noticeable decrease in performance. As far as the contention of whether it is DOM based XSS or not, I wouldn't say it is DOM based XSS. The mere mention of innerHTML does not make it DOM based XSS. The injection manifests in the assignment statement to the xss variable and not in the next line where innerHTML is referenced. Contd.. –  Vineet Reynolds May 17 '11 at 14:53

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.