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Second list squared each item on list, xs. Running the code below, python gives me 'None'

xs = [12, 10, 32, 3, 66, 17, 42, 99, 20]
a = [b**2 for b in xs]
c = (a + xs).sort()
print(c, end=', ')

Same list but different code--

xs = [12, 10, 32, 3, 66, 17, 42, 99, 20]
a = [b**2 for b in xs]
c = a + xs
c.sort()
print(c, end=', ')

...python gives me my list(c), all sorted. I don't get it. Or is there a more pythonic way to do this?

Thanks!

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What's your question? –  Gabe May 17 '11 at 2:04

2 Answers 2

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Generally speaking, anything that operates on something in-place will return None, by convention. (This convention is not necessarily always followed, however.) somelist.sort() will sort the list in-place.

If you'd rather have a sorted copy, you can just call c = sorted(a + xs). sorted operates on a copy of the original, and therefore returns the copy.

There's a much more through explanation here: http://wiki.python.org/moin/HowTo/Sorting/

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1  
@OP: Functions that pass or simply return are equivalent to return None. The output from all function calls in python are assignable even if you don't think they are returning anything at all. list.sort returns None. –  kevpie May 17 '11 at 4:23

You use generator expressions and itertools to reduce the amount of temporary storage like this

>>> import itertools
>>> xs = [12, 10, 32, 3, 66, 17, 42, 99, 20]
>>> a = (b**2 for b in xs)
>>> c = sorted(itertools.chain(a, xs))
>>> c
[3, 9, 10, 12, 17, 20, 32, 42, 66, 99, 100, 144, 289, 400, 1024, 1764, 4356, 9801]
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