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Okay, long story short, I'm learning assembly, and I'm trying to make a loop print out the ascii characters "0" - "9". So, I did all of the basics I've been seeing in examples, like saving register states with pushad and popad, allocating stack space, and making sure I leave things the way they started. So I managed this small example:

;
; Hello_World.asm
; (NASM Syntax, Windows)

    extern _printf

    section .text

_main:
  pushad                ; save register states

  push  ebp             ; save old stack
  mov       ebp, esp    ; prepare new stack
  sub       esp, 1*4    ; allocate 4 bytes

  mov       byte [esp + 0], 48  ; add ascii '0' to stack
  mov       byte [esp + 1], 0   ; add ascii NULL terminator to stack

  push  esp;        ; push the string in the stacks refrence 
  call  _printf     ; call printf()
  add   esp, 4      ; pop string refrence

  add   esp, 1*4    ; deallocate 4 bytes
  mov   esp, ebp    ; close this stack
  pop   ebp         ; restore old stack

  popad             ; restore register states
  ret               ; leave this function

This works, it prints out '0', but that's a little on the safe side. I tried adding a loop into it, but things just fall apart there. I read that the 'loop' opcode is supposed to decrement the ECX register, and go back to the label parameter should ECX > 0, however, I don't think I've quite got it yet.

So I add a few lines, and come up with this:

;
; Hello_World.asm
;

    extern _printf
    global _main

    section .text

_main:
  pushad                ; save register states

  push  ebp         ; save old stack
  mov   ebp, esp    ; prepare new stack
  sub   esp, 1*4    ; allocate 4 bytes

  mov   byte [esp + 0], 48  ; add ascii '0' to stack
  mov   byte [esp + 1], 0   ; add ascii NULL terminator to stack

  mov   ecx, 9      ; set loop counter to 9

aLoop:
  inc   byte [esp + 0]  ; increment ascii character 
  push  esp;        ; push the string in the stacks refrence 
  call  _printf     ; call printf()
  add   esp, 4      ; pop string refrence
  loop  aLoop           ; loop back to aLoop if ecx > 0

  add   esp, 1*4    ; deallocate 4 bytes
  mov   esp, ebp    ; close this stack
  pop   ebp         ; restore old stack

  popad             ; restore register states
  ret                   ; leave this function

Well, now things go crazy. I run it in command prompt and I hear this beeping through my headphones, and it's cycling through every ascii character, printing them all out. So after about 5 seconds of flying characters, I assume something overflows, and it just crashes.

I'm pretty new to assembly (today's my first day of real coding), and I don't see what's going wrong. Could someone please explain how I could better implement a loop ?

Thanks ahead! -Jason

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3 Answers 3

aLoop:
  inc   byte [esp + 0]  ; increment ascii character
  push  ecx;        ; save ecx
  push  esp;        ; push the string in the stacks refrence
  call  printf     ; call printf()
  add   esp, 4      ; pop string refrence
  pop   ecx
  loop  aLoop           ; loop back to aLoop if ecx > 0

The caller-saved registers are eax, ecx, edx. The called subroutine is allowed to modify these registers. Look for caller-saved vs callee-saved registers using a search engine. Should give you more details.

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Ahh, but you see, by pushing ecx before the string reference, esp now points to something else! Though with a little manipulation, it all works. Thanks though! –  Jason May 17 '11 at 3:50
1  
I last messed with x86 assembly 20 years ago, and it's things like this that remind me that I don't miss it. –  Mike DeSimone May 17 '11 at 4:08
    
Aph, thanks for informing me about which registers to save, this will be a big help in the future. Mike DeSimone, I think it's little things like this that make it fun, I'm doing this for the challenge, but yeah, it's tedious. –  Jason May 17 '11 at 4:22
    
Oh, don't get me wrong, it's fun for a while. I had it for a semester long class, and we just did the 8086 (no E__ registers) and the 386 just came out, so yeah, near and far pointers. But at the same time, I wrote 68000 assembly on my Mac for fun, and much prefer register files to overspecialized registers which require a lot of data moves for more complex algorithms. –  Mike DeSimone May 17 '11 at 4:30

Does the "_printf" subroutine preserve the contents of ECX? If not, that could be your problem. Try saving it across the call.

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After a quick check, that fixes it! So now with a quick push/pop of ecx to the stack, and a little manipulation to maintain my string reference, it works perfectly! Thank you very much, this is a problem I'll have to watch out for in the future. –  Jason May 17 '11 at 3:47

okay, well, what you're describing is that the loop isn't terminating for some reason. That means the problem pretty well has to be here:

  add   esp, 4      ; pop string refrence
  loop  aLoop       ; loop back to aLoop if ecx > 0

This sounds like a job for a debugger: what's really happening to ecx?

Well, I note that you're setting ecx to 9. You're then adding 4 to esp. When are you changing ecx? (Yes, I know it's supposed to be happening in the loop instruction, but if that were working you wouldn't be asking. What's really happening to ecx?)

The beeping, by the way, is easy: as you cycle through all the ASCII characters, you're hitting ASCII 0x07, the BEL character.

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Yes, I probably should find a good debugger next (any suggestions ?). But my understanding is that the 'loop' instruction is supposed to decrement the ECX register, and then do the comparison, but this does not appear to be happening. Maybe I'd be better of switching to normal comparisons and jumps... –  Jason May 17 '11 at 2:56
    
you've got a call to _printf there (btw, are you sure the calling sequence is correct?) so you could try printing the value of ecx. As far as debuggers, I don't know your environment. You've got nasm, so I assume it's probably Windows; have you got Visual Studio? –  Charlie Martin May 17 '11 at 2:58

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