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I am passing a C Macro to a function which receives it as char *. Without any reason the last character from macro gets truncated. I doubt some memory leak, but could not find where.

#define FROM "/some/local/path/from/"
#define TO "/some/local/path/to/"
....
char file[_D_NAME_MAX + 1] = {'\0'};
....
funMove(file, FROM, TO);
....
....
int funMove(char *file, char *from, char *to) {
//here the to value is one character less (/some/local/path/to) slash got truncated
}
share|improve this question
4  
How are you determining that it's truncated? – GManNickG May 17 '11 at 3:05
4  
Nope, sorry, don't believe you. You're either drunk or (far more likely) something else is wrong that you're not showing us :-) – paxdiablo May 17 '11 at 3:06
2  
Show us the text output from the C preprocessor. – Cheeso May 17 '11 at 3:09
1  
We need a lot more information. – Falmarri May 17 '11 at 3:10
3  
Since you don't show any dynamic memory allocation, a leak is not the problem in this code. Since you don't show how you determine that the value in to is truncated, we can't comment on the problem. To get it truncated, you'd have to have a modifiable string (instead of a readonly string), and something would have to modify the string to replace the trailing slash with a NUL '\0'. Many compilers put string literals into the text (code) segment and these strings are, therefore, not modifiable. – Jonathan Leffler May 17 '11 at 3:15

There's nothing wrong with the code you've shown us since the following works fine:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

#define _D_NAME_MAX 50

#define FROM "/some/local/path/from/"
#define TO "/some/local/path/to/"

char file[_D_NAME_MAX + 1] = {'\0'};

int funMove(char *file, char *from, char *to) {
    printf ("[%s] [%s] [%s]\n", file, from, to);
    return 0;
}

int main (void) {
    strcpy (file, "fspec");
    int x = funMove(file, FROM, TO);
    printf ("[%d]\n", x);
    return 0;
}

It outputs:

[fspec] [/some/local/path/from/] [/some/local/path/to/]
[0]

as expected, so there must be a problem elsewhere if you're seeing to truncated.

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

Apologies!! Actually, nothing was wrong with the code and the macro didn't get truncated but got overridden. There was another macro with the same name and content except the slash. So, the macro was got replaced instead of the intended one.

#define TO "/some/local/path/to" //header file 1
#define TO "/some/local/path/to/" //header file 2

I just had the header file 2 in mind and misunderstood that the macro got truncated. Actually, the macro from header file 1 was used instead of file 2 which was the intended one.

Thanks for all your answers and support.

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