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I have an abstract Handle<T> class that contains references an objects of type T. I want to be able to have that class be able to be converted to Handle<U>, where U is a superclass of T. I would use inheritance, but that doesn't work here. How would I go about doing this? What are good alternatives?

Example psuedo code:

template<class T>
class Handle {
public:
    virtual ~Handle () {}
    virtual T & operator* () const = 0;
    virtual T * operator-> () const = 0;
    virtual template<class U> operator Handle<U>* () const = 0; // being lazy with dumb pointer
};

template<class T>
class ConcreteHandle : public Handle<T> {
public:
    explicit template<class U> ConcreteHandle (U * obj) : obj(obj) {}
    virtual ~ConcreteHandle () {}
    virtual T & operator* () const {
        return *obj;
    }
    virtual T * operator-> () const {
        return obj;
    }
    virtual template<class U> operator Handle<U>* () {
        return new ConcreteHandle<U>(obj);
    }
private:
    T * obj;
};

As requested, this is what I'm doing

class GcPool {
public:
    virtual void gc () = 0;
    virtual Handle<GcObject> * construct (GcClass clazz) = 0;
};

class CompactingPool : public GcPool {
public:
    virtual void gc () { ... }
    virtual Handle<GcObject> * construct (GcClass clazz) { ... }
private:
    Handle<GcList<Handle<GcObject> > > rootSet; // this will grow in the CompactingPool's own pool
    Handle<GcList<Handle<GcObject> > > knownHandles; // this will grow in the CompactingPool's own pool.
};

knownHandles needs to be compatable with Handle so it can be in the CompatingPool's rootSet. Same goes for rootSet. I will bootstrap these special handles so a chicken and egg problem does not occur.

share|improve this question
    
Why not just make operator Handle<U>() concrete in the base class? Could it really ever make sense for a different implementation to be provided? –  Tony D May 17 '11 at 4:34
    
My application needs (read: wants) various types of handles. Different memory (gc) pool types spit out different handles. Then again, I could be overengineering. Still an interesting question for me though. –  Thomas Eding May 17 '11 at 4:37
    
@Tony: That would make class Handle use its derived class in its implementation. You could do it, but assuming there are actually multiple possible classes derived from class Handle, then it makes no sense. If there are not, then there should be no polymorphism to start with. –  Keith May 17 '11 at 4:39
    
@trinithis: Have you considered using a template argument rather tha polymorphism to manage the allocator? Note that it doesn't have to be as complex as STL allocators. –  Keith May 17 '11 at 4:41
    
I'm writing a compiler and want garbage collection in the language. I have GcPool as an abstract class. GcPool has a pure virtual construct(Class) function that returns Handle<GcObject>. I'm updating my first implementation of GcPool, CompactingPool to internally use handles after a little bootstrapping so it can allocate more handles in its own pool. But I want these handles with better types than GcObject, such as GcStack. Maybe this is a thing for explicit casts.... –  Thomas Eding May 17 '11 at 4:48

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted
virtual template<class U> operator Handle<U>* () const  =0;

Template virtual function is not allowed by the language specification.

Consider this code at ideone, and then see the compilation error:

error: templates may not be ‘virtual’


Now what can you do? One solution is this:

template<class T>
class Handle {
public:

    typedef typename T::super super; //U = super, which is a superclass of T.

    virtual ~Handle () {}
    virtual T & operator* () const = 0;
    virtual T * operator-> () const = 0;

    //not a template now, but still virtual
    virtual super operator Handle<super> () const = 0;  
};

That is, define a typedef of the base class in the derived class, and use it in the Handle. Something like this:

struct Base {//...};

struct Derived : Base { typedef Base super; //...};

Handle<Derived>  handle; 

Or you can define traits, as:

struct Base {//... };

struct Derived : Base { //... };

template<typename T> struct super_traits;

struct super_traits<Derived>
{
   typedef Base super;
};

template<class T>
class Handle {
public:

    typedef typename super_traits<T>::super super; //note this now!

    virtual ~Handle () {}
    virtual T & operator* () const = 0;
    virtual T * operator-> () const = 0;

    //not a template now, but still virtual
    virtual super operator Handle<super> () const = 0; 
};

In my opinion, super_traits is a superior solution, as you're defining the traits of derived classes without editing them. Also, you can define as many typedefs as you want; say your derived class has more than one base, you may want to define many typedefs, or preferably a typelist.

share|improve this answer
1  
@Nawaz, OP wants the effect of virtual template method. That's why he has mentioned as psuedo code. Can assume that he should be aware of error. –  iammilind May 17 '11 at 4:44
    
@iammilind: Since virtual template is not possible, then its out of the question now. You cannot define virtual template. –  Nawaz May 17 '11 at 4:45
    
That's restating the known problem... the code in the question's indicative of the desired functionality - Keith knows it doesn't work. What he wants is something functionally equivalent. –  Tony D May 17 '11 at 4:46
    
@Tony: What do you mean by "it doesn't work"? –  Nawaz May 17 '11 at 4:47
2  
@Nawaz, Tony means that the questioner wants some functionality which simulates virtual template, –  iammilind May 17 '11 at 4:49

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