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int overlap(const char *s1, const char *s2){
    int i = 0;
    while (s1[i] && s2[i] && s1[i] == s2[i])
        i++;
    return i;
}

This returns the length of the substring overlap between the two strings it takes as input. However, if the two strings are:

abcdefg
1234efg

it returns an overlap of 0 because it can only read overlaps that start at the beginning of the strings, can someone modify or help me to make it so that it can read overlaps no mantter where they are in the strings?

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1  
That's no small modification. What should the program output in this situation? s1 = abcdefgh, s2 = 1bc45fgh--2 or 3, or 5? –  Matt Phillips May 17 '11 at 5:18
2  
You have to define what your function does PRECISELY first. I smell some inconsistency between what you wanted and what's in your code. –  shinkou May 17 '11 at 5:21
    
What about abcdef and abcef? –  muntoo May 17 '11 at 5:27
    
Does your overlap need to be in the same position to count? For example, would the result for "hello world" and "the worst!" be 4 (matching " wor" or 0 (no characters in the same position match)? –  Michael Burr May 17 '11 at 7:59

6 Answers 6

up vote 0 down vote accepted

well i have thought this question again. i think you want an overlap at the same index in each string. pay attention to the character '\0' in the end of each string.

so we can write the codes as the following:

int overlap(const char *s1, const char *s2){
    int i = 0;
    while (*s1 != '\0' && *s2 != '\0') {
        if (*s1++ == *s2++) i++;
    }
    return i;
}

for "abcdefg" and "1234efg", it will return 3.

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The easy way to do this is to build a suffix-tree for the two strings(this is done using McCreght ). now just look for the longests common substring with origin in both strings.

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This might be the easiest with reasonable performance, but brute force is undeniably easier (~25 lines of off-the-top-of-my-head C). And I think for his problem domain (200 strings of 50 characters each, mentioned here: stackoverflow.com/questions/6025939/…), the performance of brute force probably wouldn't be a problem. –  Michael Burr May 17 '11 at 7:51
    
@MichaelBurr the problem is if the strings are aligned, if not I don't think there is a more elegant way then the suffixtree. –  Martin Kristiansen May 17 '11 at 9:54
1  
A prefix table or a borders table (c.f. Crochemore "Algorithms on Strings") would probably be a much simpler solution than a suffix tree. –  Tim Dumol Nov 5 '12 at 12:39

i think the codes will be like this:

int overlap(const char *s1, const char *s2){
    int i = 0, n = 0;
    while (s1[i] && s2[i]) {
        if (s1[i++] == s2[i++]) n++;
    }
    return n;
}
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2  
There is two i++... –  calandoa May 17 '11 at 12:56

Looks a little bit like homework to me, is it?

You'r while clause exits as soon as it discovers a difference between the strings. You will have to loop over the entire string, and for each index i count it if s1[i] == s2[i].

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Assuming that you want an overlap at the same index in each string, as in your example:

int overlap(const char *s1, const char *s2){
    int length = 0;
    int i = 0;
    while (s1[i] && s2[i] && s1[i] != s2[i])
        i++;
    while (s1[i] && s2[i] && s1[i] == s2[i]) {
        i++;
        length++;
    }
    return length;
}

will do the trick, although it's not very elegant. It will find the length of the first overlap at the same offset.

So for abcdefgh90 and 1234efg890 it will return 3.

If you want the total number of matching characters then try:

int overlap(const char *s1, const char *s2){
    int length = 0;
    int i = 0;
    while (s1[i] && s2[i]) {
        if (s1[i] == s2[i]) {
            length++;
        }
        i++;
    }
    return length;
}
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int overlap(const char *s1, const char *s2){
    int k;
    for(k = 0; s1[k] != s2[k]; k++)  // <--- add this loop
      if(0 == s1[k] || 0 == s2[k])
        return 0;
    int i = k;     // initialize to k + 1
    while (s1[i] && s1[i] == s2[i])  // check only s1 (or s2)
        i++;
    return i - k;  // return difference
}
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