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I am just starting to learn flash/actionscript 3 and decided to code up a simple particle simulator.

The very initial design simply involves filling the screen with a buncha particles which scatter away from the cursor if you were to click.

This works, but is a bit unresponsive. I am using graphics.drawCircle() to draw the particles, and each particle is inherited from Sprite.

Listener for mouseclick event:

private function mouseClick(e:MouseEvent):void
{
    trace("click");
    var now:Date = new Date();
    trace("Before: "+now.getTime());
    for each (var p:Particle in particleList)
    {
        var dist:Number = distance(e.localX,e.localY,p.x,p.y);
        if (dist < 50)
        {
            var xVel:Number = p.x - e.localX;
            var yVel:Number = p.y - e.localY;

            xVel *=  Math.max(0,50 - dist) * 0.05;
            yVel *=  Math.max(0,50 - dist) * 0.05;
            p.xVel +=  xVel;
            p.yVel +=  yVel;
        }
    }

    var later:Date = new Date();
    trace("After: "+later.getTime());
    trace("Total: "+(later.getTime()-now.getTime()));

    //e.
}

In Particle, there is a frame listener that runs this every frame:

public function loop(e:Event):void
{
    if (xVel != 0 || yVel != 0 || setup)
    {
        setup = false;
        x +=  xVel;
        y +=  yVel;


        if (x < 0)
        {
            x = 0;
            xVel =  -  xVel;
        }
        if (x > stageRef.stageWidth)
        {
            x = stageRef.stageWidth;
            xVel =  -  xVel;
        }
        if (y < 0)
        {
            y = 0;
            yVel =  -  yVel;
        }
        if (y > stageRef.stageHeight)
        {
            y = stageRef.stageHeight;
            yVel =  -  yVel;
        }


        graphics.clear();
        graphics.lineStyle(.25,0xFFFFFF,0.5);
        graphics.drawCircle(0,0,1);

        xVel *=  Engine.friction;
        yVel *=  Engine.friction;
    }

    if (xVel < 0.01 && xVel > -0.01)
    {
        xVel = 0;
    }

    if (yVel < 0.01 && yVel > -0.01)
    {
        yVel = 0;
    }
}

How should I make this more efficient? I plan on doing collision detection and other physics interactions later, and this is already a bit slow even without the hefty number crunching code I intend to add later.

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IMHO, fastest option is setPixel method from @Cay's answer. If you need somewhat bigger particles, you can set three/four/whatever pixels for each one. But if particles are really large, use BitmapData.draw. –  alxx May 17 '11 at 10:36

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Using graphics is quite slow for too many shapes... Without much change in your code you could try to, each frame, draw your shapes in a BitmapData (either draw them first in a single shape, or in many shapes, and then use BitmapData draw followed by clearing all your graphics). I think you should get a small improvement. The basic code is this:

for(...) {
   shape.graphics.drawCircle(0,0,1);
}
bitmapData.draw(shape);
shape.graphics.clear();

On the other hand, the fastest way I know for 1 pixel particles is using BitmapData and setPixel for each particle:

bitmapData.fillRect(bitmapData.rect, 0);
bitmapData.lock();
for(...) {
   bitmapData.setPixel(x,y,0xFFFFFF);
}
bitmapData.unlock();

For bigger or more complex particles, I've heard copyPixels is the way to go, but you need to blitt all of your different particles beforehand (I don't have much experience with this one though, and I've found many situations when it has been better to use BitmapData draw, or even having each bitmapData in a different sprite):

bitmapData.fillRect(bitmapData.rect, 0);
for(...) {
   bitmapData.copyPixels(myParticle10, myParticle10.rect, new Point(tx, ty));
}

I hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
1  
copyPixels will work good only for rectangular ones, isn't it? If particle has transparent edges, it must be drawn, not just copied. –  alxx May 17 '11 at 8:51
    
yup, you're right :) –  Cay May 17 '11 at 9:10
    
I should only have 1 bitmapdata instance right? Not one per particle –  Razor Storm May 17 '11 at 15:19
    
Only one. Your screen is drawn on large bitmapdata, particle is just a pixel on it. –  alxx May 17 '11 at 20:35

The best and fastest way to have a huge number of particles in Actionscript is to blit them to a bitmapdata. I'm kind of a nut for particles, and I really like this method. Here is a tutorial about how to do it, with a cool looking particle effect clock.

http://plasticsturgeon.com/2010/08/make-super-cool-as3-particle-effects-for-flash-games-with-bitmapdata/

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