Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

This sounds a little crazy, but I'm wondering whether possible to get reference to comment element so that I can dynamically replace it other content with JavaScript.

<html>
<head>
</head>
<body>
<div id="header"></div>
<div id="content"></div>
<!-- sidebar place holder: some id-->
</body>
</html>

In above page, can I get reference to the comment block and replace it with some content in local storage?

I know that I can have a div place holder. Just wondering whether it applies to comment block. Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
It would be far easier, and more efficient, to use a unique ID as a placeholder. If there's not a convenient element where you need it, create an empty <div> or <span> and assign your ID to that. – Blazemonger Mar 17 '15 at 19:43
    
The problem with <div> and <span> is they can interfere with CSS selectors and may end up taking up visible space or affecting the flow of content etc. - my solution was to use <script> tags instead, see my answer below. – mindplay.dk Mar 23 at 9:45
up vote 14 down vote accepted
var findComments = function(el) {
    var arr = [];
    for(var i = 0; i < el.childNodes.length; i++) {
        var node = el.childNodes[i];
        if(node.nodeType === 8) {
            arr.push(node);
        } else {
            arr.push.apply(arr, findComments(node));
        }
    }
    return arr;
};

var commentNodes = findComments(document);

// whatever you were going to do with the comment...
console.log(commentNodes[0].nodeValue);
share|improve this answer
2  
Thanks. But the traverse of DOM tree must cost a lot. So, we'd better don't use comment as place holder. – Morgan Cheng May 18 '11 at 2:16

Building off of hyperslug's answer, you can make it go faster by using a stack instead of function recursion. As shown in this jsPerf, function recursion is 42% slower on my Chrome 36 on Windows and 71% with IE11 in IE8 compatibility mode. It appears to run about 20% slower in IE11 in edge mode but faster in all other cases tested.

function getComments(context) {
    var foundComments = [];
    var elementPath = [context];
    while (elementPath.length > 0) {
        var el = elementPath.pop();
        for (var i = 0; i < el.childNodes.length; i++) {
            var node = el.childNodes[i];
            if (node.nodeType === 8) {
                foundComments.push(node);
            } else {
                elementPath.push(node);
            }
        }
    }

    return foundComments;
}

Or as done in TypeScript:

public static getComments(context: any): Comment[] {
    var foundComments = [];
    var elementPath = [context];
    while (elementPath.length > 0) {
        var el = elementPath.pop();
        for (var i = 0; i < el.childNodes.length; i++) {
            var node = el.childNodes[i];
            if (node.nodeType === 8) {
                foundComments.push(node);
            } else {
                elementPath.push(node);
            }
        }
    }

    return foundComments;
}
share|improve this answer

If you use jQuery, you can do the following to get all comment nodes

comments = $('*').contents().filter(function(){ return this.nodeType===8; })

If you only want the comments nodes of the body, use

comments = $('body').find('*').contents().filter(function(){
     return this.nodeType===8;
 })

If you want the comment strings as an array you can then use map:

comment_strings = comments.map(function(){return this.nodeValue;})
share|improve this answer

It seems there are legitimate (performance) concerns about using comments as placeholders - for one, there's no CSS selector that can match comment nodes, so you won't be able to query them with e.g. document.querySelectorAll(), which makes it both complex and slow to locate comment elements.

My question then was, is there another element I can place inline, that doesn't have any visible side-effects? I've seen some people using the <meta> tag, but I looked into that, and using that in <body> isn't valid markup.

So I settled on the <script> tag.

Use a custom type attribute, so it won't actually get executed as a script, and use data-attributes for any initialization data required by the script that's going to initialize your placeholders.

For example:

<script type="placeholder/foo" data-stuff="whatevs"></script>

Then simply query those tags - e.g.:

document.querySelectorAll('script[type="placeholder/foo"]')

Then replace them as needed - here's a plain DOM example.

Note that placeholder in this example isn't any defined "real" thing - you should replace that with e.g. vendor-name to make sure your type doesn't collide with anything "real".

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.